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DAILY QUOTE for February 7, 2016

To love God as He ought to be loved, we must be detached fro...

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February 7

 

To love God as He ought to be loved, we must be
detached from all temporal love.
We must love nothing but Him, or
if we love anything else, we must love it only for His sake.

St. Peter Claver


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SAINT OF THE DAY

St. Luke the Younger

At times, Luke was seen suspended above the ground in prayer...

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St. Luke the Younger

Born on the Greek island of Aegina, Luke belonged to a family of farmers. Saracen raiders forced his family to leave their homeland for Thessaly, where Luke worked in the fields and tended sheep. He was a dutiful child, but his charity towards the poor often frustrated his parents: Luke would often give his own food and clothing to those less fortunate. He was so charitable that God blessed him, and his family’s crops flourished, but his parents still did not approve.

After his father's death, Luke decided to become a hermit. The decision angered his mother, who wanted her son at home. He left Thessaly to find a monastery, but was captured by soldiers who mistook him for a runaway slave. Imprisoned for a short time, he then returned to his mother after he convinced his captors of his true identity.

Later, two monks on their way to the Holy Land persuaded Luke's mother to allow him to join a monastery in Athens. After only a short time, Luke’s superior claimed that his mother had appeared to him in a vision calling for help, and Luke was sent home.

Eventually, Luke's mother understood her son's call to religious life and no longer opposed him. Luke built his hermitage on Mount Joannitsa, near Corinth when he was only eighteen. At times, Luke was seen suspended above the ground in prayer. After his death, his cell was transformed into an oratory and named the Place of Healing.

WEEKLY STORY

Why Ash Wednesday? Why Ashes?

Catholics proclaim their Faith in the public square as they...

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Why Ash Wednesday? Why Ashes?

Ash Wednesday is the first day of the season of Lent symbolic of the forty days Our Lord fasted in the desert. Occurring forty six days before Easter, it is consequently moveable-as early as February 4 and as late as March 10.

The ashes applied to the forehead, made from the palms of the previous year’s Palm Sunday, are blessed, perfumed with incense, and hydrated with a little holy water or oil as a binding agent. Thus treated, the ashes are considered a Sacramental.

The Catholic Church is replete with sacramentals, holy objects, words and rituals that we can see, touch and hear to help convey to our spirit an attitude of openess to Grace.

The ash used on Ash Wednesday, accompanied by the words "Remember that you are dust and to dust you shall return," or, "Turn away from sin and be faithful to the Gospel" places us in a disposition of penance and humility, which is the attitude needed for a fruitful, Grace-filled Lent.

Sacramentals are specially potent when well explained to children who are so visual and touch oriented. They are a powerful means to convey the unseen mysteries of our Faith to their young minds. 

 

WOC Devotional Set Flag

Catholics proclaim their Faith in the public square as they go about marked with a black cross.