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DAILY QUOTE for May 6, 2015

I am not capable of doing big things, but I want to do ev...

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May 6

 

I am not capable
of doing big things, but
I want to do everything,
even the smallest things,
for the greater glory of God.

St. Dominic Savio

 

 I will not allow JESUS to be crucified again! - Sign this petition HERE!

SAINT OF THE DAY

St. Petronax of Monte Cassino

Saints, and prominent men of all kinds, sought the hospit...

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St. Petronax of Monte Cassino

Petronax is considered to be the second founder of the Monastery Abbey of Monte Cassino, initially established by St. Benedict of Nursia.

A native of Brescia, Petronax was encouraged by Pope St. Gregory II to make a pilgrimage to the tomb of St. Benedict in the year 717. There, among the ruins of the old monastery destroyed by the Lombards in 581, he found a few hermits. These solitaries elected Petronax superior, and other disciples soon gathered.
With the help of prominent nobles, especially the Duke of Benevento, and with strong backing from three popes, Petronax rebuilt Monte Cassino. Under the new abbot’s lengthy and energetic rule the community thrived once again, regaining its old eminence. Saints, and prominent men of all kinds, sought the hospitality of the great Benedictine abbey.

Petronax led the community until his death about the year 747.

Photo by: Halibutt

WEEKLY STORY

Humility Is Compatible with the Rich Dress of One’s Office*

Saint Francis de Sales, the bishop of Geneva, while on a...

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Humility Is Compatible with the Rich Dress of One’s Office*

Saint Francis de Sales, the bishop of Geneva, while on a journey during Lent, went to the church attached to a monastery of Capuchin friars. He arrived at sermon time; the preacher had taken ostentation in dress as his sermon’s theme and was inveighing vehemently against prelates and ecclesiastical dignitaries who, instead of setting an example of humility, wore splendid garments.

When the sermon ended, the bishop went into the sacristy and summoned the preacher. Once they were alone, Saint Francis said, “Reverend Father, your discourse was edifying. It may also be true that we who are in authority in the Church are guilty of sins from which the inmates of the cloister are exempt. Nevertheless, I consider it highly unwise to say such things as you did on this subject from the pulpit, to the common people. Moreover, I wish to call your attention that for many reasons it is a matter of necessity that the princes of the Church should keep up an appearance befitting their rank. Besides, one never knows what may be hidden beneath a silken robe.”  Saint Francis unbuttoned the upper part of his purple cassock, and let the monk see that he wore a ragged hair shirt next to his skin. “I show you this,” Saint Francis added, “so that you may learn that humility is quite compatible with the rich dress of one’s office. From henceforth see that you are less harsh in your judgments and more prudent in your speech.”

If the dignitaries of the Church were wretchedly dressed, they would lose the respect due to themselves and to their office. Therefore it is not only permissible, but obligatory upon them, to dress in accordance with the official rank they hold.

* Adapted from Father Francis Spirago’s Anecdotes and Examples Illustrating the Catholic Catechism (New York: Benziger Brothers, 1904), 187–188.

Saint Francis de Sales, the bishop of Geneva, while on a journey during Lent, went to the church attached to a monastery of Capuchin friars. He arrived at sermon time; the preacher had taken ostentation in dress as his sermon’s theme and was inveighing vehemently against prelates and ecclesiastical dignitaries who, instead of setting an example of humility, wore splendid garments.