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Lessons from the Holy Grotto By Plinio Correa de Oliveira

 

In the moral order, the world is composed largely of sinners, selfish creatures who live not to serve God, but to please themselves. These self-serving souls comprise the vast majority of mankind, especially in times of decadence – as were the days of Our Lord, as are our own.

In their selfishness, such men strive to gratify their disordered love of worldly riches, worldly delights, and worldly honors, as Saint John, the beloved Apostle, describes them. By worldly riches, he means the avarice of those who, in a frenzy, seek what they regard as a great fortune. These grasping Midases are so attached to the possession of money that often they do not take advantage of what they have, living in an obscure, banal, and even miserable state. Worldly delights denote the pleasures generated by the senses, that is, taste, sight, touch, sound, and smell. They, sensual pleasures above all, are ultimately everything agreeable and pleasing that a life of luxury may provide. In seeking worldly honors, man desires the exaggerated consideration of others, striving to be the object of great homage and adulation, in a word, to have prestige.

When man does not seek after God, he elects one of these three pleasures as his ultimate end. In him there exists an ontological unity that translates into a unity of objective. Thus, human egoism tends necessarily toward one of these three poles. For a time, some determined souls may strive for all three – worldly riches, delights, and honors – but having sampled each, they ultimately make one their life's goal.

As Saint Ignatius teaches, God wished to educate man through the birth of His Divine Son. The circumstances of His birth show that worldly riches, delights, and honors are nothing compared with the supernatural treasures, joys, and grandeur of God.

 

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Vanity of worldly riches

God, Who is infinitely rich, came to earth in poverty. In the stable of Bethlehem, Our Lord Jesus Christ, Omnipotent Lord of all, eloquently instructs us regarding the vanity of worldly riches.

Holy Grotto of Bethlehem Stained Glass NativityHe chose the poorest place imaginable for His birthplace – a manger. Wrapped in swaddling clothes by His Mother, the Holy Babe was sheltered in a stable made for beasts.

Through His birth in such impoverished circumstances, the Word of God made evident the indifference with which we should regard this world’s riches. Used rightly, money may contribute to passing and imperfect happiness, but all too frequently it is the cause of suffering, anguish, and even tragedy.

The Holy Family sought, first and foremost, to obey the Divine Will in all things, in this receiving a hundredfold here on earth, as promised in the Gospel (Matt. 19:29).

In man, a virtuous life generates supernatural happiness and often natural happiness as well – happiness so incommensurably more valuable than worldly riches that it inspired Saint Francis to confide the following to Brother Masseo:

“My dear companion, let us beg Saints Peter and Paul to teach us to possess the immeasurable treasure of holy poverty; for it is a treasure so divine that we are not worthy of possessing it , considering that it is a celestial virtue, by means of which earthly and transitory possessions are trampled underfoot and by means of which every obstacle retreats before the soul, so that the soul may be freely united with the eternal God. This is the virtue that permits souls on earth to converse with angels in Heaven. This is the virtue that accompanied Christ on the Cross, with which Christ was buried, the virtue with which He resurrected and ascended into Heaven. It fascinates souls in this life and gives them wings to carry them to Heaven in the next, for it bears the marks of humility and charity” (The Little Flowers of Saint Francis, Part 1, no. 13).

 

Disdain of worldly delights

Our Lord could have ordered the angels to embellish the Holy Grotto with the most delicate silks, the most aromatic perfumes, and the most celestial symphonies. He could have enjoyed every legitimate material delight from the first moment of His human life. Instead, He chose the very opposite. His delicate body lay not on soft silk, but on coarse straw. His crib was a feeding trough which, however diligently scoured by Our Lady, did not exude the sweet smells of exquisite perfumes. Born at midnight in the depth of winter, the Holy Infant trembled in the cold night air, warmed only by the breath of beasts. His cradlesong was the lowing of cows. Thus, Our Lord Jesus Christ showed us how foolish it is to make this world’s delights the end of our lives. To the contrary, Christ taught us to disdain them for the glory of God and the good of souls, in the measure that they distract and even deviate us from our ultimate end, the eternal delight of unending life with Him.

 

Emptiness of worldly honors

Our Lord wished to deprive Himself of everything that might serve as a symbol of worldly prestige. While Jesus was born a Prince of the Royal House of David, that house had lost its power and prestige in the eyes of the world. Indeed, Christ the King was born an outcast, for none would shelter Our Lady who bore Him within Her womb; Saint Joseph had knocked on door after door, only to be sent away. The Child Jesus demonstrated the vanity of those who seek only to be seen in the eyes of the world.

 

True grandeur

Let us now take a moment to contemplate the grandeur and majesty of the Child Jesus and His Most Holy Mother.

Imagine the Holy Grotto of Bethlehem, lofty and spacious as a cathedral. Its rustic stones transcend their lack of architectural definition, bringing to mind the vaults of a magnificent basilica. The cradle of the Infant Jesus lies beneath the point where several of the embryonic arches, crafted by nature, come together.

The Magi Adore Christ at the Holy Grotto Stained Glass ImageIn heralding the birth of her Divine Son, the Archangel Gabriel said to the Blessed Virgin Mary:
“He shall be great, and shall be called the Son of the Most High; and the Lord God shall give unto Him the throne of David His father; and He shall reign in the house of Jacob forever” (Luke 1:32-33)

Within that grotto lay a Baby, fragile yet omnipotent, the King of Heaven and Earth, God-made-Man.

From the first moment of His conception within the maternal cloister, He possessed grandeur and power infinitely superior to that of any man who has ever lived – of all men from the beginning to the end of time.

Incomparably more powerful than Alexander the Great, Charlemagne, or Napoleon, or any and all of the mightiest armies known to man; immeasurably wiser than King Solomon, Saint Thomas the Angelic Doctor, and the hosts of human genius; within that grotto lay a Child whose every expression reflected divine majesty, ineffable holiness, utter wisdom, and limitless power.

Enchanted, let us consider the perfections mysteriously expressed in the fair countenance of the Child Jesus. One moment, He reveals His Divine majesty. In another, a resplendent light shines forth from His eyes – the windows of His soul. He inspires sinners to convert – to repent and confess their sins – while He attracts them through the intimacy of His love.

The German mystic Anne Catherine Emmerich thus describes a vision she had of the Nativity:

“I saw Our Lord as a very little child, resplendent, whose brilliance surpassed that of every light in the grotto, lying upon the floor, before the knees of Mary. It seemed to me that He was very small and grew larger before my eyes. Then I saw Angels in human form all about, prostrate in adoration before the Child” (The Life, Passion, and Glorification of the Lamb of God).

It is said that as a child, Saint Thérèse of the Child Jesus had such a stately bearing that her father called her “my little queen.” During the process of her canonization, the gardener of the Carmel testified that he came unobserved upon one of the nuns working and recognized her as Sister Thérèse. Asked how he was able to identify her without seeing her face, he replied that it was by her majesty, for none of the other sisters was as majestic as she.

What then could we say of Our Lady, Queen of Heaven and Earth? Let us contemplate the Most Holy Virgin, the masterpiece of Creation, most majestic and pure, praying to her Divine Infant, as an angelic chorus intones anthems of adoration. Touched by the Holy Family, the ambience of that humble stable transcends the grandeur of the most refined court.

Approaching a scene so sacred, we revere the Christ Child, and in Him adore all that is beautiful, noble, and holy. We prostrate ourselves before the Divine Incarnation. The perfect model of all created grandeur, which is but a mere reflection of His Infinite Majesty, the God-Man attracts every form of sanctity, while repelling sin, error, and chaos. He does not reject but rather embraces the humble and contrite sinner. He beckons all who seek Truth and who have Faith.

 


 Taken from Crusade Magazine, Nov-Dec1998

 

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Quote of the day

DAILY QUOTE for April 2, 2020

Do not grieve over the temptations you suffer. When   ...

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April 2

Do not grieve over the temptations you suffer.
When the Lord intends
to bestow a particular virtue on us,
He often permits us first to be tempted by the opposite vice.
Therefore, look upon every temptation as an invitation
to grow in a particular virtue and
a promise by God that you will be successful,
if only you stand fast.

St. Philip Neri


My Mother, I will stand with you on OCTOBER 10, 2020

Saint of the day

SAINT OF THE DAY

St. Francis of Paola

Francis explained that the lives of kings are in the hands o...

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St. Francis of Paola

Born in Paola, a small town in Calabria, Francis’ parents were humble, industrious people, dedicated to the service of God. Childless after several years of marriage, the couple prayed earnestly for a son, and when, at last a boy was born to them, the grateful parents named him Francis after the Poverello of Assisi.

At age thirteen Francis was placed in the Franciscan friary of S. Marco where he learned to read and where he began to tread the austere life he was later to live.

Two years later, after a pilgrimage to Assisi and Rome, and with his parents’ consent, Francis retired to a remote location by the sea where he lived in a cave. Before he was twenty, he was joined by two others who also sought a life of prayer in solitude. With help from some neighbors, they built for themselves three cells and a chapel where they sang the divine praises.

Seventeen years later a church and monastery were built on the spot for them with the approval of the bishop of Cosenza. The hermits were so beloved of the people that the whole countryside joined in the work.

Penance, charity, humility. This trinity formed the foundation of Francis of Paola’s rule, which was particularly austere. In addition to the vows of obedience, poverty and chastity, he imposed a fourth binding them to observe a perpetual Lent, abstaining not only from meat, but also from eggs and milk products.

The community received Papal approval in 1474, and in 1492 from being called Hermits of St. Francis of Assisi, they became the “Minims” from their founder’s desire to be known as the least (minim) in the kingdom of God.

Francis of Paola became universally renowned as a wonderworker and prophet. In 1481, King Louis XI of France, who was slowly dying, sent a messenger to the saint begging him to hasten to France to heal him. Francis only acquiesced at the command of the Holy Father to whom the monarch ultimately appealed. At the French court the king fell on his knees before the humble hermit begging for his healing. Francis explained that the lives of kings are in the hands of God and have their appointed limits; prayer should be addressed to God. Ultimately, changed in heart, the king died resignedly in the saint’s arms. In gratitude, his son, Charles VIII, became a great sponsor of the Order.

Francis spent twenty-five years in France and died there on Good Friday of the year 1507 at the age of ninety-one. He was canonized in 1519.

Weekly Story

WEEKLY STORY

I turned to God, but God seems to remain deaf to me. Why is...

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Why Doesn't God Answer My Prayer?

Question:  I pray and pray, but I feel as if God is not listening. We always had a good, peaceful family life, but these last years have been tough. We don’t seem to be getting along and our finances have taken a turn for the worse.

I am so anxious about this situation that, not having anyone to turn to, I turned to God.

But God seems to remain deaf to me. Why is that? In addition, what do I say to certain people, agnostics and atheists, who laugh at prayer, saying it is nonsensical and only a figment of the imagination with no real value?

Answer:  God is faithful to His promises, and God promised to answer our prayers. “And I tell you, ask, and it will be given you; seek, and you will find; knock, and it will be opened to you. For every one who asks receives, and he who seeks finds, and to him who knocks it will be opened” (Luke 11:9–10).

If God promises to answer our prayers, He will do so infallibly. But in prayer there are two sides: he who asks and He Who gives.

Our part is to ask. How must we ask?

Saint Alphonsus Liguori, a Doctor of the Church, teaches in his book Prayer, the Great Means of Salvation that prayer must be persevering and humble.

So many times we hear people saying: “Oh, I used to ask God for this and that and the other, but He never gave it to me. Now, ten years later, how glad I am that He didn’t!”

One thing is certain: God will not fail to answer a humble and perseverance prayer. Whether He chooses to grant what we ask immediately or make us wait, we must trust that He, regardless of appearances, is doing us good. What we think is good and what He thinks is good may be two different things: “My thoughts are not your thoughts, nor your ways My ways” (Isa. 55:8), but here is where we must abandon ourselves to His beneficent will. Our part is to be patient, calm and, above all, faithful, because this is the time for testing and later will come the time for full enjoyment.


Answering Atheists and Agnostics
As for atheists and agnostics, their skepticism proceeds from the fact that they, respectively, deny God’s existence or deny men’s capacity to know God.

In this case, we can only express our regret over their ignorance of this Supreme Being, our omnipotent Creator and loving Savior.

We may direct them to a few sources that may help in their search for the truth of His existence. Atheism and agnosticism can only be sustained in ignorance or ill will because the evidence of God’s existence is overwhelming.

Moreover, God will not hide Himself from those who seek Him sincerely and unconditionally.

Another consideration pertaining to non-believers is this: If God were to grant us absolutely everything we ask at a moment’s notice, such people might start believing purely out of self-interest.

They would look at God as a wand-wielding wizard. And God Our Lord is infinitely more than that. He wants us to know, love, and serve Him for Himself so that He can treat us as children and heirs and grant us unending happiness in Heaven.

"My impression is that the Rosary is of the greatest value not only according to the words of Our Lady of Fatima, but according to the effects of the Rosary one sees throughout history. My impression is that Our Lady wanted to give ordinary people, who might not know how to pray, this simple method of getting closer to God."  Sister Lucia, one of the seers of Fatima.

 

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I turned to God, but God seems to remain deaf to me. Why is that? In addition, what do I say to certain people, agnostics and atheists,

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