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Fatima Custodian Kenneth Murphy

Kenneth Murphy was born and raised in Ireland but moved to the United States in 2007 to work in the mission of spreading the Fatima message with America Needs Fatima. Once a year he visits his parents and siblings back home.

 

Q – Why have you decided to devote your life to this mission?

Mr. Murphy – I attribute my preservation in the faith to my parents who insisted on a daily family rosary. Praying the rosary was not on my list of fun things to do as a child, but it formed a habit which everyone in our family keeps to this day. My older brother is a history professor in Ireland, and when we talk on the phone, many times he finishes with, “I need to go finish my rosary”. My sister recently dedicated herself as a nun in Italy. I also have two brothers who are much better at saying the rosary than I was.
Before joining this work, I visited a seminary to discern God’s plans for me, but came to believe that the priesthood was not my calling. Instead, I felt called to spread Our Lady’s Fatima message. The world needs both good priests and good laymen to go out and refill the churches. The promises of the rosary show that it is a most powerful tool to turn normal Catholics into strong Catholics, and even non-Catholics into Catholics.
After doing the work of the Fatima Visits for four years, my Mom told me that when she was expecting me it was a difficult pregnancy. Holding a picture of Our Lady of Fatima in the hospital, she promised the Blessed Mother that if I was born without complications she would dedicate me to her. This picture of Our Lady hangs in my room today, a confirmation that I am where she wants me.

 

Q – What effects/graces/challenges, etc. have you witnessed at the Fatima visits?

Mr. Murphy – Some people have told me about miracles and cures that they received during or after a presentation but I believe the most incredible graces are when families decide to change and take to heart the three things Our Lady called for: prayer, sacrifice and amendment of life. At every visit you can see at least a few people making strong resolutions.
I recently revisited a family at whose home I had done a presentation two years before. When the time came to say the rosary, the husband told the children to fetch their rosaries, to which the children quickly disappeared into their rooms, all returning rosary in hand. They all knew the prayers perfectly, a huge transformation from the previous visit.

 

Q – Can you share with us your favorite Fatima story?

Mr. Murphy – Doing a Fatima presentation in Anaheim, California, the host told me that he had been at a Fatima Visit in 1998. He only attended because his mother, who was dying as a result of a malpractice, asked it of him.  He said he listened to the presentation with a closed heart, but because of the explanation about the rosary, decided to pray for a miracle. However, during the rosary, his heart again hardened and he made up his mind to kill the doctor after the Fatima visit.  He went to his room to retrieve his gun, but the key to the gun case, which he normally carried in his key ring, was nowhere to be found. He searched everywhere, and asked his brothers if they had seen the key. They all swore they had not touched it. A month later, he found the key in his room. By this time, his mother had passed, and he had simmered down. Sensing the hand of providence, he thanked Our Lady for having kept him from such a crime, and began to say his rosary daily. In 2013, receiving a Fatima postcard in the mail, he scheduled a Fatima visit himself.

 

Q – Please offer any other comments that would be helpful to readers.

Mr. Murphy – Schedule a Fatima visit! Have a presentation at your home. And if you live in Boston keep in mind that I prefer savory food over cakes, water over soda and beer over everything else.

 


 


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Quote of the day

DAILY QUOTE for January 18, 2021

To live without faith, without a patrimony to defend, withou...

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January 18

 

To live without faith,
without a patrimony to defend,
without a steady struggle for truth,
that is not living, but existing.

Bl. Pier Giorgio Frassatti


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Saint of the day

SAINT OF THE DAY

St. Prisca

A great eagle appeared above her and protected her body for...

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St. Prisca

There are actually three St. Priscilla’s who lived in the first few centuries of the Church – all of whom were martyrs – and two of them share the same feast day of January 18! It is the virgin martyr St. Prisca that the Church primarily celebrates today though.

Prisca was born of a noble family in Rome during the reign of Claudius II. Most likely a Christian from birth, she was arrested during the persecutions when she was a young teenager and brought before the Emperor for questioning. Despite her youth, Prisca courageously proclaimed and upheld her Catholic Faith, even though she knew that by doing so in those days was ultimately the pronouncement of her own death sentence.

She suffered terrible tortures, one of which was being taken to the arena to be devoured by wild beasts. Rather than devour her though, the lions are said to have licked her feet! Finally, she was taken outside the city walls and beheaded. Legend tells us that when she was martyred, a great eagle appeared above her and protected her body for several days until the Christians were able to retrieve it.

The young martyr was buried in the Catacomb of St. Priscilla - the catacomb named after the St. Priscilla, wife of a Roman senator, who shares the same feast day of January 18 with the child-martyr, Prisca. She is said to have opened her home near the catacomb to Christians and to have befriended St. Peter who used her home as his headquarters in Rome. She was martyred during the reign of Emperor Domitian. As an interesting fact, there is probable speculation that this St. Priscilla was a family relation of the child-martyr St. Prisca, who is buried in her catacomb.

The third  St. Priscilla was a disciple of St. Paul and wife of the Jewish tentmaker, Aquila.

St. Margaret of Hungary

She would have no other bridegroom than Jesus Christ,  and...

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St. Margaret of Hungary

Margaret of Hungary was the daughter of King Bela IV, a champion of Christendom, and Maria Laskarina, a pious Byzantine princess. Bella IV being the brother of St. Elizabeth of Hungary, Margaret was the saintly Queen of Hungary’s blood niece.

King Bela and his queen, worried about an impeding Tartar invasion, vowed to dedicate to God the child they were expecting. Bela was victorious over the Tartars, and little Margaret was taken to the Dominican monastery at Vezprem at the age of three.

The child thrived in her new surroundings. By age four she had memorized the Little Office of the Blessed Virgin Mary. At age ten she was moved to a convent built for her by her father on an island – today named Margaret Island – on the Danube near Buda and there she professed her vows at age twelve.

King Ottokar II of Bohemia having seen Margaret at eighteen years of age, ignoring her religious habit, sought her in marriage. A dispensation would have been possible in this case, and King Bela seemed to favor the prospect for political reasons. Yet, Margaret adamantly refused declaring she would have no other bridegroom than Jesus Christ, and would rather cut off her nose and lips.

Margaret’s was a life of astounding penance, prayer and charity toward the poor. To avoid preferential treatment in the convent because of her royal rank, she sought the most menial tasks to the point that a maid once said that she was humbler than a servant.
Her body worn out by the fatigue of long hours of labor, fasting and prayer, Margaret died at the age of twenty-eight on January 18, 1270. The virtuous princess was universally venerated as a saint from the time of her death.

Weekly Story

WEEKLY STORY

One night, the Blessed Virgin appeared to him and told him h...

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Mary and the Muslim

Don Octavio del Monaco was a wealthy citizen of 17th century Naples. Like many of his class, Don Octavius had several Muslim slaves in his household. These children of Islam were amazed at the kindness of their “master.” He fed and clothed them better than they received in their native land. In return, his slaves attended to their tasks with diligence, as Don Octavius did not over work them, but assigned them duties in keeping with their dignity as children of God.

If these Muslim slaves had any reason for complaint, it was the gentle persistence with which their master and his wife exhorted them to give up their false religion and become Catholics. Don Octavius even went so far as to invite the slaves to join his family in the chapel to worship the one true God with them!

Our story today is about one young slave in particular. His name was Abel, like the slain son of Adam and Eve. He felt drawn in a peculiar way to a lamp that burned in front of a shrine to Holy Mary. Abel would purchase the oil needed to keep the lamp lit from his own meager stipend. As he continued to practice this humble devotion, he would say, “I hope that this Lady will grant me some great favor.”

One night, the Blessed Virgin appeared to him and told him he must become a Christian. At first the Turk resisted. But she placed her hand upon his shoulder, and said to him: “Now no longer resist, Abel, but be baptized and called Joseph,” conferring on him a name that was very dear to her Immaculate Heart indeed.

On August the 10th, 1648, there was much rejoicing in Heaven, for on that day “Joseph” and eleven other Muslims converted to the Christian faith and were baptized. Their conversion was brought about by the kindness shown by Don Octavius and the special intercession of the Mother of God.

Our story does not end here. Even once this son of hers was safely baptized, Mother Mary delighted in visiting him. Once, after having appeared to him, she was about to depart. But the Moor seized her mantle, saying, “Oh, Lady, when I find myself afflicted, I pray you to let me see you.” In fact, she one day promised him this and when Joseph found himself afflicted he invoked her, and Mary appeared to him again saying, “Have patience", and he was consoled.

From the Glories of Mary, by St. Alphonsus Maria de Liguori.

One night, the Blessed Virgin appeared to him and told him he must become a Christian.

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