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Header - Family Tip 16 - Saintly Role Models

 

“Let everything take second place to our care of our children,
our bringing them up in the discipline and instruction of the Lord!”
St. John Chrysostom

 

When life starts to unfold for a child, has he been equipped with a mentor to help him deal with a variety of life situations as a true Catholic, faithful in every way to the spirit and teachings of Our Lord Jesus Christ?

Is he ready with answers to essential questions:
What does a saint do when made fun of and laughed at?
How does a saint deal with financial difficulties?
What did a specific saint do in the face of temptation?
What does sanctity require when I have to conquer my own will in a society that preaches the deification of personal desires and wants?

 

Do we give our children the chance to really get to know the saints and choose them as mentors?
Will our children know:

1. How St. Camillis de Lellis overcome his gambling addiction?
2. Where St. Maria Goretti found the strength and courage to stay pure?
3. What did St. Paul do to manage his life-long temptation?
4. How did St. Therese stay innocent and grow in love for Our Lord?
5. What did St. Francis of Assisi do during the Crusades: was he really just an animal-lover and environmentalist, or was he a strong and heroic champion for the Truth? Or both?

 

The Process:

What do we do in every situation to learn what we want to learn? We study. We take courses. We read.

So, if we want to go to Heaven and be with God for all eternity then we need to make an effort, we need to study, we need to learn. But not just some short little stories from this saint or that saint. We need to study in depth and to master the subject matter.

By doing this, we set an example for our children. And we introduce the saintly mentoring program to them.

 

Saintly Role Models

Benefits:

1. Children will behave better.

2. They will have a model to contrast with false Hollywood ones they will inevitably be exposed to.

3. They will eventually inspire their own parents and be for them a great source of joy.

 

Some tips:

1. Have them choose a saint. One that they are attracted to after you have given them an overview of that saint's life and acts of virtue.

 

2. Then just as at school, the child goes from K – 12 and beyond, so also with the life of that saint. Encourage them to really, really know what they are talking about. Start a young child off with a short picture book on that saint. Then perhaps the next year have them read a larger book or history of the saint. Then the next year have them do a report on the important dates and events in the life of that saint.

 

3. If you get the child interested in a saint, by the time they hit the teenage years you can introduce them to some of the writings of their favorite saint. As time goes on, the child will learn the life, the writings, the virtue, the challenges, the feats and the achievements of that saint. The mentoring has happened.

It is certain that the superheroes produced by Marvel and DC will pale in comparison with men and women who have resurrected the dead, moved mountains with a simple command and thrown thousands of demons back into Hell. This will engender admiration and regard for the saints and for virtuous lives.

Furthermore, in being acquainted with the saint’s writings, the teenager will begin acquiring some substantial knowledge that will help guide his or her steps in life.

 

Children Need Guidance: But all this will depend on parents. If the parent convinces himself or herself that this whole idea is a "pie in the sky" it will never happen. But what is so big or difficult about getting their own children interested in the lives of saints?

Do it and the outcome will be astonishing. Fight the modern culture which is not only evil but it has also taken a turn towards insanity.

 

Beware the warning: As the children in your life grow in admiration and in the practice of virtue, so will you too be pressured to do the same.

Not a bad situation…..that is, if you and your family are among those who believe that God has the right to be obeyed and that He will one day judge everyone, both the living and the dead.

 


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Quote of the day

DAILY QUOTE for July 16, 2019

Today God invites you to do good; do it therefore today. Tom...

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July 16

 

Today God invites you to do good;
do it therefore today.
Tomorrow you may not have time, or
God may no longer call you to do it.

St. Alphonsus Maria de Liguori


PLEDGE REPARATION TO OUR LADY HERE!

Saint of the day

SAINT OF THE DAY

Our Lady of Mount Carmel

Elias saw the cloud as a symbol of the Virgin mentioned in t...

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Our Lady of Mount Carmel

The title of Our Lady of Mount Carmel can be traced back to the hermits living on Mount Carmel in Israel during the Old Testament. This ancient community prayed for the advent of the Virgin-Mother through whom salvation was promised to mankind. In Hebrew, “Carmel” means “garden”. In ancient times this mountain was celebrated for its lush, verdant, and flowery beauty.

It was also on Mount Carmel that the Prophet Elijah prayed to God for rain during a terrible drought afflicting Israel for its sins and idolatry of Baal. The first sign that his prayer was answered was a tiny cloud that appeared in the sky out over the Mediterranean, the precursor of a great rainfall.

Elias saw the cloud as a symbol of the Virgin mentioned in the prophecies of Isaiah (7:14). The hermits took after his example and prayed likewise for the advent of the much-awaited Virgin who would become the mother of the Messiah. Praying thus became their spiritual mission.

Theologians see in that little cloud a figure of Mary, bringing salvation in the seventh age of the world. As the clouds arise out of the sea without the weight and the salinity of the waters, so has Mary arisen out of the human race without its stains.

In the twelfth century, St. Berthold, a Frenchman, pilgrim or crusader, came to Mount Carmel seeking to visit Elijah’s cave, and ended by founding a community imbued with the Marian spirit of the holy prophet and the hermits of old.

St. Brocard, successor of St. Berthold, set their way of life to a Rule, which was approved by Pope Innocent IV in 1247. From the time of St. Brocard, these monks were known as the “Brothers of Our Lady of Mount Carmel.”

Our Lady of Mount Carmel cannot be mentioned without also mentioning her brown scapular. On July 16, 1251, Our Lady appeared to St. Simon Stock, an English Carmelite monk, and then General of the Carmelite Order. On one arm she held the Child Jesus and on the other a brown garment called a scapular, to be draped over the front and back of a person. As she showed him this garment she said, “This shall be the privilege for you and for all the Carmelites, that anyone dying in this habit shall be saved.”

This privilege is extended to lay persons who, wishing to participate in this promise, choose to be enrolled in a small version of the scapular by an officiating priest or deacon.

This practice must not be understood superstitiously or “magically”, but in light of Catholic teaching that perseverance in the theological virtues of faith, hope and charity are required for salvation.

Weekly Story

WEEKLY STORY

In the Secret of the Rosary, St. Louis de Montfort relates t...

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The Rosary and the Possessed Girl

In his book, The Secret of the Rosary, St. Louis de Montfort relates that a Dominican, Father Jean Amat, was once giving a Lenten Mission in the Kingdom of Aragon, Spain, when a young girl, possessed by the devil was brought to him.

Father Amat began the exorcism. After several unsuccessful attempts, the priest had an idea; taking his Rosary, he looped it around the girl’s neck. 

No sooner had he done this, the girl began to squirm and scream and the devil, shouting through her mouth shrieked, “Take if off, take off; these beads are tormenting me!”

At last, moved to pity for the girl, the priest lifted the Rosary beads off her neck.

The next night, while the good Dominican lay in bed, the same devils who possessed the young girl entered his room. Foaming with rage, they tried to seize him, but he had his Rosary clasped in his hand and no efforts from the infernal spirits could wrench the blessed beads from him.

Then, going on the offensive and using the Rosary as a physical weapon, Fr. Amat scourged the demons crying out, “Holy Mary, Our Lady of the Rosary, help me, come to my aid!” at which the demons took flight.

The next day on his way to church, the priest met the poor girl, still possessed. One of the devils within her taunted him, “Well, brother, if you had been without your Rosary, we should have made short work of you…”

With renewed trust and vigor, the priest unlaced his Rosary from his belt, and flinging it around the girl’s neck commanded, “By the sacred names of Jesus and Mary His Holy Mother, and by the power of the holy Rosary, I command you, evil spirits, leave the body of this girl at once.”

The demons were immediately forced to obey him, and the young girl was freed.

“These stories,” concludes St. Louis de Montfort, “show the power of the holy Rosary in overcoming all sorts of temptations from the evil spirits and all sorts of sins because these blessed beads of the Rosary put devils to rout.”

Click here to order your Free Rosary Guide Booklet

In the Secret of the Rosary, St. Louis de Montfort relates that a Dominican, Father Jean Amat, was once giving a Lenten Mission in the Kingdom of Aragon, Spain, when a young girl, possessed by the devil was brought to him.

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