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Header - Family Tip 16 - Saintly Role Models

 

“Let everything take second place to our care of our children,
our bringing them up in the discipline and instruction of the Lord!”
St. John Chrysostom

 

When life starts to unfold for a child, has he been equipped with a mentor to help him deal with a variety of life situations as a true Catholic, faithful in every way to the spirit and teachings of Our Lord Jesus Christ?

Is he ready with answers to essential questions:
What does a saint do when made fun of and laughed at?
How does a saint deal with financial difficulties?
What did a specific saint do in the face of temptation?
What does sanctity require when I have to conquer my own will in a society that preaches the deification of personal desires and wants?

 

Do we give our children the chance to really get to know the saints and choose them as mentors?
Will our children know:

1. How St. Camillis de Lellis overcome his gambling addiction?
2. Where St. Maria Goretti found the strength and courage to stay pure?
3. What did St. Paul do to manage his life-long temptation?
4. How did St. Therese stay innocent and grow in love for Our Lord?
5. What did St. Francis of Assisi do during the Crusades: was he really just an animal-lover and environmentalist, or was he a strong and heroic champion for the Truth? Or both?

 

The Process:

What do we do in every situation to learn what we want to learn? We study. We take courses. We read.

So, if we want to go to Heaven and be with God for all eternity then we need to make an effort, we need to study, we need to learn. But not just some short little stories from this saint or that saint. We need to study in depth and to master the subject matter.

By doing this, we set an example for our children. And we introduce the saintly mentoring program to them.

 

Saintly Role Models

Benefits:

1. Children will behave better.

2. They will have a model to contrast with false Hollywood ones they will inevitably be exposed to.

3. They will eventually inspire their own parents and be for them a great source of joy.

 

Some tips:

1. Have them choose a saint. One that they are attracted to after you have given them an overview of that saint's life and acts of virtue.

 

2. Then just as at school, the child goes from K – 12 and beyond, so also with the life of that saint. Encourage them to really, really know what they are talking about. Start a young child off with a short picture book on that saint. Then perhaps the next year have them read a larger book or history of the saint. Then the next year have them do a report on the important dates and events in the life of that saint.

 

3. If you get the child interested in a saint, by the time they hit the teenage years you can introduce them to some of the writings of their favorite saint. As time goes on, the child will learn the life, the writings, the virtue, the challenges, the feats and the achievements of that saint. The mentoring has happened.

It is certain that the superheroes produced by Marvel and DC will pale in comparison with men and women who have resurrected the dead, moved mountains with a simple command and thrown thousands of demons back into Hell. This will engender admiration and regard for the saints and for virtuous lives.

Furthermore, in being acquainted with the saint’s writings, the teenager will begin acquiring some substantial knowledge that will help guide his or her steps in life.

 

Children Need Guidance: But all this will depend on parents. If the parent convinces himself or herself that this whole idea is a "pie in the sky" it will never happen. But what is so big or difficult about getting their own children interested in the lives of saints?

Do it and the outcome will be astonishing. Fight the modern culture which is not only evil but it has also taken a turn towards insanity.

 

Beware the warning: As the children in your life grow in admiration and in the practice of virtue, so will you too be pressured to do the same.

Not a bad situation…..that is, if you and your family are among those who believe that God has the right to be obeyed and that He will one day judge everyone, both the living and the dead.

 


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Quote of the day

DAILY QUOTE for October 26, 2020

He who does not acquire the love of God will scarcely persev...

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October 26

 

He who does not acquire the love of God
will scarcely persevere in the grace of God, for
it is very difficult to renounce sin
merely through fear of chastisement.

St. Alphonsus Maria de Liguori


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Saint of the day

SAINT OF THE DAY

St. Cedd of the East Saxons

Gaelic, early Welsh, Frankish, Old English and Latin speaker...

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St. Cedd of the East Saxons

What little is known about St. Cedd comes to us from the saintly Venerable Bede, an early English historian.

A native of the region of Northumbria, England, he was one of four brothers, one of whom was St. Chad. By the year 653 he had been ordained a priest.

At the time what is today the British isle was divided into several small kingdoms. Under the influence of St Augustine of Canterbury and other missionary saints the seeds of Christianity were sown far and wide throughout the land.

King Oswid of Northumbria, having been baptized by St. Finan, sent Cedd to evangelize the Middle Angles of Mercia. Mercia’s king was Penda, a pagan tolerant of Christianity, while his son, Peada, had promised to become Christian in exchange for the hand of King Oswid’s daughter in marriage.

Though Cedd made some headway in Mercia, his brother Chad reaped a greater harvest ten years later, probably under the more secure patronage of Peada.

From Mercia, Cedd was sent to re-evangelize the East Saxons at the request of King Sigeberht, who under the influence of King Oswid accepted baptism from St. Finan. Bede speaks of Cedd as a man unafraid to confront the powerful.

His success in this mission, earned for him the respect of St. Finan who consecrated him bishop of the East Saxons. Cedd built churches and founded two monasteries, one of which was the monastery of Lastingham. Both structures were eventually destroyed by the Danes.

In 664 Cedd was present at the Synod of Whitby, and was one of those who accepted the implementation of the Roman calendar and practices as opposed to the Celtic rite. Bede recounts that his ease with languages greatly aided in the communication of the various parties, which spoke Gaelic, early Welsh, Frankish, Old English and Latin.

He died of a plague that struck in 664. He was succeeded by his brother St. Chad as abbot of Lastingham.

Weekly Story

WEEKLY STORY

The recitation of the Rosary was always a great help to Vero...

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The Rosary Saves Soldiers in Kuwait

Veronica first learned of the Rosary as a small girl watching her father fingering the beads. At first she thought he was “playing” with the shiny strand, but later, realizing the full meaning of her father’s action, and under the promptings of Grace, she became a devotee of the Rosary as well.

The recitation of the Rosary was always a great help to Veronica, who felt the Blessed Mother’s protection in her life. But then, when her youngest son, Randy, was stationed in Kuwait during Desert Storm, the devotion was to play a crucial role.

While attending a convention of Catholic Women, and greatly concerned for her son’s safety, she confided to a presiding priest that Randy was serving overseas. The good priest then suggested she and others in the group join him in praying a Rosary for Randy’s safety and other pressing intentions. Something compelled Father and the ladies not only to say five decades, but to persevere for several hours.

Two weeks later Veronica received a letter from her son in which he described that he and fellow soldiers had been in a harrowing conflict. As the bullets whizzed by, he feared for his and his buddies’ lives and prayed with all his heart. Suddenly, a great calm came over him and he heard a voice, “from the sky” that assured him they would be alright.

Conferring dates and times, mother and son marvelled at finding that the time in which he and the others were in dire peril was the same day and hour Father, Veronica and her friends were persevering in reciting the Rosary.


Note: Based on a story from 101 Inspirational Stories of the Rosary by Sister Patricia Proctor, OSC

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The recitation of the Rosary was always a great help to Veronica, who felt the Blessed Mother’s protection in her life.

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