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Header-The Ecce Homo

By Fr. Francis Spirago

 

A wealthy couple, in spite of all their riches, lived in constant discord and daily disputes. The married state was anything but a happy state for them; the wife especially often shed bitter tears.

One day she happened to come across a manuscript book which was entitled “Simple Remedies for the Household.” It was in her grandmother’s handwriting.

As she idly flipped through the pages, to her surprise her eye fell upon the heading: “A household remedy against discontent.”

Intrigued by the entry’s title, she read on:

“Whenever you feel miserable or are out of temper, go to the picture of the ‘Ecce Homo’ and place yourself at its feet. Contemplate it attentively for the space of three minutes, and recite three Our Fathers before you go away: this will restore peace and content to your mind. My confessor advised me to do this. I have tried the remedy for thirty years, and I have never found it to fail.”

Praying to Our LordThe lady remembered that by a mere chance she had kept the picture in question, which had belonged to her grandmother; it was upstairs in the attic.

She went up at once, dusted it carefully, and placed it in her room.

Whenever she felt that a quarrel was near, she tried the simple remedy her grandmother recommended.

Through gazing at the countenance of Our Lord, so sorrowful and yet so gentle, she became so much more forbearing and complaisant that her husband soon commented on the change.

She answered him with a smile: “I have found an excellent teacher.”

He wanted to know who that teacher was. She told him everything quite frankly.

Before long, her husband also had recourse to this same remedy, when he foresaw some household annoyance was in store for him.

Thus in the course of time, peace and happiness prevailed in that family circle.

 

Click here to print a picture of 'Ecce Homo' for your home!

 


 Taken from Anecdotes and Examples Illustrating the Catholic Catechism by Fr. Francis Spirago, pp. 336-337.

 

 

Quote of the day

DAILY QUOTE for December 2, 2020

A society that needs healing and regeneration will receive i...

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December 2

 

A society that needs healing and regeneration will receive it mostly
from the innocent.
The pure can look on the impure without contempt.
It was Divine Innocence Who asked of a sinful woman:
Where are they who accused you?” (John 8:10)

Archbishop Fulton J. Sheen


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Saint of the day

SAINT OF THE DAY

St. Chromatius of Aquileia

Empress Aelia Eudoxia resented Chrysostom’s denouncements...

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St. Chromatius of Aquileia

Chromatius was brought up in the city of Aquileia, at the head of the Adriatic Sea. In all likelihood, he was probably born here as well. His father died when he was young, and he lived with his widowed mother, older brother and unmarried sisters. His mother had the good opinion of St. Jerome, which the saint expressed in a letter to her in 374. His brother also became a bishop.

After his ordination, Chromatius took part in the synod against Arianism in 381. Later, as bishop, he rooted Arianism out of his diocese.

He baptized the monk, theologian, and historian, Rufinus in his early manhood.

On the death of St. Valerian in 388, Chromatius was elected bishop of Aquileia, and became one of the most distinguished prelates of his time.

Situated at one of the busiest crossroads of the Roman Empire, Aquileia was a major center of trade and commerce. Under Chromatius' care, guidance and influence it also became renowned as a center of learning and orthodoxy.

He kept up an extensive correspondence with both Sts. Ambrose and Jerome and also with Rufinus.  A scholarly theologian himself, Chromatius encouraged the Bishop of Milan to write exegetical works, and St. Jerome in his own writings. He helped St. Heliodorus of Altino to finance St. Jerome’s translation of the Bible.  It was also owing to Chromatius’ encouragement that Rufinus undertook the translation of Eusebius’ Ecclesiastical History and other works.

He acted as mediator in a dispute that arose between St. Jerome and Rufinus concerning the writings of Origen. He also wrote to Emperor Honorius in defense of St. John Chrysostom, Bishop of Constantinople, over his troubles with the bishop of Alexandria and the Empress Aelia Eudoxia, who resented Chrysostom’s denouncements of extravagance. Though Honorius wrote to his brother Emperor Arcadius in Constantinople, the intervention had no effect.

Chromatius was also an active exegete. Seventeen of his treatises on St. Matthew’s Gospel survive, as well as a fine homily on the Eight Beatitudes. Chromatius died about the year 407.

Photo Credit: GFreihalter

Weekly Story

WEEKLY STORY

Whoever recites this prayer fifteen times a day from the fea...

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A Christmas Prayer

(It is piously believed that whoever recites the below prayer fifteen times a day from the feast of St. Andrew the Apostle (Patron of Scotland; 30th Nov.) until Christmas will obtain what is asked.)

America Needs Fatima also believes it's pleasing and efficacious any time of the year.

Click the image to download it.

 

Whoever recites this prayer fifteen times a day from the feast of St. Andrew the Apostle (30th Nov.) until Christmas will obtain what is asked.

 

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