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Our Lady of the Sacred Heart, Our Powerful Advocate in Heaven

Our Lady of the Sacred Heart, Our Powerful Advocate in Heaven

By Plinio Corrêa de Oliveira


June is the month dedicated to the Sacred Heart of Jesus. In this article written by Professor Plinio Corrêa de Oliveira in 1940, it expresses the thoughts of this illustrious Catholic thinker. These insights still remain astonishingly valid today. He stated, “If an impenitent humanity can expect every catastrophe, a repentant humanity can expect every mercy.” Since then, humanity has not shown “the least beginning of an efficacious, serious and profound repentance,” but instead has further aggravated its sinful state. Hence, it is no surprise that God is compelled to apply His justice, making Our Lady’s role as Advocate of Sinners only more urgent.

If there was ever an epoch whose only hope for a remedy can be the Sacred Heart of Jesus, it is our own. It would be useless to attenuate the enormity of the crimes committed by humanity everywhere. In one of his encyclicals, Pius XI said that the moral degradation of the contemporary world is such as to place it in the imminence of being cast into spiritual conditions even more miserable than those in which the world found itself when our Savior came.

In other words, the errors accumulated throughout the centuries that preceded us—the deliriums of the pseudo-Reformation, the diabolical audacities of the Encyclopedia movement, unbridled moral libertinism, the crimes of the French Revolution, the apostasy of German philosophers—created an ambience of universal corruption that culminated in the catastrophes, chaos and runaway lewdness that humanity witnesses in the twentieth century. And in the abyss into which we have plunged, iniquity is so profound that Pius XI feared that to a large majority of men, the infinite benefits of Redemption, which Our Lord brought to the world, might be canceled out.

Naturally, the sight of so many crimes suggests the idea of divine revenge. When we look at this sinful world, groaning amid the tortures of a thousand crises and a thousand anguishes and still remaining unrepentant; when we look at the horrifying advance of neo-paganism that is about to govern all mankind; finally, when we see cowardice, negligence and disunion among those who still have not joined the side of evil, our souls tremble at the thought of the catastrophes that the obstinate impiety of this generation accumulates upon it.

It would be somewhat liberal to imagine that such crimes do not deserve chastisement and that such an apostasy of the masses has taken place merely owing to an intellectual error not entailing the commission of a grave sin by humanity. This is not reality. God does not abandon His creatures, and if the latter fall away from Him, they only have themselves to blame.

 

God Wishes to Save Mankind from Catastrophe

Is there no other alternative for humanity today but to disappear in a deluge of mud and fire? Can we hope for no other future but an ignominious sunset in which final impenitence will be punished with the supreme scourges Scripture announces as the telltale signs of the world’s end?

The destruction of Sodom and Gomorrah by fire and brimstone in the old testament is a perrenial reminder of God's infinite justice. Image "The flight of Lot" by Gustave Doré depicting the sceneThis would be the case undoubtedly if God were to set only His justice in motion, and we do not even know whether the world would have reached the twenty-first century of our era, but since God is not only just but also merciful, the gate of salvation has still not been closed for us.

A humanity that perseveres in impiety can expect God’s rigorous punishments. But God, Who is infinitely merciful, does not want the death of sinful mankind but that it “may be converted and live.” Thus, His grace seeks out insistently all men to have them give up their evil ways and return to the Good Shepherd’s fold.

If an impenitent humanity can expect every catastrophe, a repentant humanity can expect every mercy, and to obtain that, it is not necessary for repentance to have finished carrying out its work of restoration. It is enough for the sinner, though still in the bottom of the abyss, to turn to God with a simple but efficacious, serious and profound beginning of repentance, and he will immediately find God’s help, as God never forgets him.

The Holy Ghost says in Scripture: “Can a woman forget her infant, so as not to have pity on the son of her womb? and if she should forget, yet will not I forget thee” (Isaias 49:15). Even in extreme cases in which a paroxysm of evil would exhaust a mother’s forbearance, God does not tire. For God’s mercy benefits the sinner even when divine justice strikes him with a thousand scourges on his way of iniquity.

 

The Infinite Love of the Sacred Heart of Jesus

These two essential images of divine justice and mercy should be raised constantly before contemporary man’s eyes.

In a display of both perfect justice toward the hypocritical Pharisees and mercy toward the adulterous woman, Our Lord admonished her to "Go, and now sin no more" (John 8:11) Image "Jesus and the woman taken in adultery by Gustave Doré depicts the sceneThat of justice, so he does not harshly presume he will be saved without merits; that of mercy, so he does not despair of salvation as long as he wishes to amend himself. And if the hecatombs of our days speak so clearly of God’s justice, what better image would there be to complete this picture than the Sun of Mercy, which is the Sacred Heart of Jesus?

God is charity, and hence the mere enunciation of the Most Holy Name of Jesus recalls the idea of love: The unfathomable and infinite love that led the Second Person of the Most Holy Trinity to become incarnate!

This love is expressed in the incomprehensible humiliation of a God who manifests Himself to men as a poor boy born in a manger.

This love transpired throughout the thirty years of a recollected life in humble and strict poverty and in the incessant toils of three years of evangelization in which the Son of Man sowed love and reaped ingratitude.

This love was demonstrated at that Last Supper that was preceded by Our Lord’s generosity in washing His disciples’ feet and crowned with the institution of the Eucharist.

This love appeared in that last kiss given to Judas, the supreme gaze on Saint Peter, the affronts suffered in patience and meekness, the sufferings born until all His strength was spent; and it appeared on His pardon by which Dimas stole Heaven and in the extreme donation of His heavenly Mother to miserable humanity.

Each of those episodes has been studied meticulously by scholars, piously meditated by saints, marvelously depicted by artists, and above all, incomparably celebrated by the Church’s liturgy. There is only one way to speak about the Sacred Heart of Jesus: It is to recall every one of those instances appropriately and in detail.

The Holy Church, by venerating the Sacred Heart, wants nothing more than to render special praise to the infinite love that Our Lord Jesus Christ gave men. Since the heart symbolizes love, by venerating His Heart, the Church celebrates Love.

 

Our Lady: God’s Most Beloved

Not one of the varied and beautiful invocations with which the Church refers to Our Lady fails to show a relationship between her and God’s love. These invocations either celebrate a gift of God to which Our Lady was perfectly faithful or a special power that she has upon her divine Son.

Now then, what do God’s gifts prove if not a special love of the Creator, and what does Our Lady’s power with God prove, but that same love? God loved Our Lady so much that He concentrated in her all the perfections that a mere creature can possess. Thus, while she could be appropriately called “Mirror of Justice” she can also be called “Imploring Omnipotence” as no grace is obtained without Our Lady, and there is no grace that she could fail in obtaining for us.

Therefore, to invoke Our Lady under the title of the Sacred Heart is to make a most beautiful synthesis of all other invocations; it is to recall the most pure and beautiful reflection of Divine Motherhood; it is to resonate all the chords of love and enunciate the various invocations of the Hail Holy Queen.

 

Our Lady of the Sacred Heart: Sinful Humanity’s Advocate

But there is an invocation that I would especially like to recall. It is Advocate of Sinners. Our Lord is Judge; and however great His mercy may be, He cannot fail to exert that function.

In no other creature is Our Lord more perfectly reflected than in His holy Mother Mary. Stained glass of Sacred Hearts of Jesus and Mary, Saint Mugo's Church, Scotland. However, Our Lady is only an advocate, and no one ignores that the advocate’s function is to defend the accused.

So, to say that Our Lady of the Sacred Heart is our advocate is to recognize that we have in Heaven an intercessor whose hands hold the key to an infinite ocean of mercy.

What better solution for a humanity that ignoring justice falls deeper into sin, but when faced with it, despairs of salvation? Let us show Justice, since to do so is a duty whose omission has produced most lamentable fruits.

But alongside Justice, which strikes the unrepentant, let us never forget Mercy, which helps seriously repentant sinners to abandon sin and be saved.

 


 

About the Author

Born in 1908, Plinio Corrêa de Oliveira was the founder of the Brazilian Society for the Defense of Tradition, Family and Property and inspirer of twenty-five other sister organizations around the world.

A brilliant scholar, writer, university professor and lawyer, Professor de Oliveira was above all a great Catholic leader whose only ambition was to defend Christian civilization against its systematic destruction. Thus, he dedicated his life to the service of the Church in the temporal sphere, fighting particularly the errors of Communism, Socialism and the resulting Cultural Revolution.

He felt a special calling to work for the sanctification of families and temporal society, and had a special charisma to spot the subliminal evil influences of today’s culture. By the time of his death in 1995, he had produced a wealth of writings in the form of meditations, articles and books sharing with us his unique gift and insight.

 


 

 

 

 

Quote of the day

DAILY QUOTE for May 18, 2021

Our Lord loves you and loves you tenderly; and if He does no...

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May 18

 

Our Lord loves you
and loves you tenderly; and
if He does not let you feel the sweetness of His love,
it is to make you more humble and abject in your own eyes.

St. Padre Pio of Pietrelcina


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Saint of the day

SAINT OF THE DAY

St. Eric IX of Sweden

The king’s zeal for the faith was far from pleasing to his...

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St. Eric IX of Sweden

Eric the Holy or Erik the Saint was acknowledged king in most provinces of Sweden in 1150, and his family line subsisted for a hundred years. He did much to establish Christianity in Upper Sweden and built or completed at Old Uppsala the first large church to be erected in the country. It is said that all the ancient laws and constitutions of the kingdom were, by his orders, collected into one volume, which came to be known as King Eric’s Law or The Code of Uppland.

The king soon had to take up arms against the heathen Finns. He vanquished them in battle, and at his desire, St. Henry, Bishop of Uppsala, who had accompanied him on the expedition, remained in Finland to evangelize the people.

The king’s zeal for the Catholic Faith was far from pleasing to his nobles, and we are told that they entered into a conspiracy against him with Magnus, the son of the king of Denmark. King Eric was hearing Mass on the day after the feast of the Ascension when news was brought that a Danish army, swollen with Swedish rebels, was marching against him and was close at hand. With unwavering calm he answered, “Let us at least finish the sacrifice; the rest of the feast I shall keep elsewhere”. After Mass was over, he recommended his soul to God, and marched forth in advance of his guards. The conspirators rushed upon him, beat him down from his horse, and beheaded him. His death occurred on May 18 in 1161.

The relics of St. Eric IX of Sweden are preserved in the Cathedral of Uppsala, and the saintly king's effigy appears on the coat of arms of the city of Stockholm.

Pope St. John I

The king had the pontiff arrested at Ravenna and thrown into...

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Pope St. John I

St. John I was a native of Siena in Tuscany and was one of the seven deacons of Rome when he was elected to the papacy at the death of Pope Hormisdas in the year 523.

At the time, Theodoric the Great ruled over the Ostrogoths in Italy and Justin I was the Byzantine Emperor of Constantinople. King Theodoric supported the Arian heresy, which denied the divinity of Christ.

Justin I, the first Catholic on the throne of Constantinople in fifty years, published a severe edict against the Arians, requiring them to return to orthodox Catholics the churches they had taken from them. The said edict caused a commotion among eastern Arians, and spurred Theodoric to threaten war.

Ultimately, he opted for a diplomatic solution and named Pope John, much against his wishes, to head a delegation of five bishops and four senators to Justin.

Pope John, refused to comply with Theodoric’s wishes to influence Justin to reverse his policies. The only thing he did obtain from Justin was for him to mitigate his treatment of Arians, thus avoiding reprisals against Catholics in Italy.

After the delegation returned, Theodoric, disappointed with the result of the mission, and growing daily more suspicious at reports of the friendly relations between the Pope and Justin I, had the pontiff arrested at Ravenna.

Pope John I died in prison a short time later as a result of ill treatment.

Weekly Story

WEEKLY STORY

As the century began anew, so did Catherine’s life. Cathe...

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The Rosary & True Beauty

As the century began anew, so did Catherine’s life.

Catherine was a young woman possessing great beauty. So much so, that she was known to those in Rome where she made her home as “Catherine the Beautiful.” Sadly, Catherine’s beauty went only skin deep, and she led a very sinful life.

One afternoon, strolling the streets of Rome, Catherine heard the voice of St. Dominic. This was the early 13th century and it was not unusual to cross paths with this great man of God.

On this particular day, he was preaching on the devotion to the Mother of God and the importance of praying her most holy Rosary. Caught up in the moment, Catherine had her name inscribed in the book of the confraternity and began to recite the Rosary. Though praying the Rosary gave her a sense of calmness she had not known before, Catherine did not abandon her sinful ways.

One evening, a youth, apparently a nobleman, came to her house. Catherine invited the handsome young man to stay to dine with her. When they were at supper, she saw drops of blood falling from his hands while he was breaking a piece of bread. Moments later, she observed, much to her discomfort, that all the food he took was tinged with blood.

Gathering up some courage to appease her curiosity, she asked him what that blood meant. With a firm but gentle look in his eyes, the youth replied that a Christian should take no food that was not tinged with the blood of Jesus Christ and sweetly seasoned with the memory of His passion.

Amazed at this reply, Catherine asked him who he was. "Soon," he answered, "I will show you." The rest of their meal passed uneventfully, yet always the drops of red catching Catherine’s eye, causing her to wonder about this man she supped with.

After dinner, when they had withdrawn into another room, the appearance of the youth changed. To Catherine’s stunned gaze, he showed himself crowned with thorns, his flesh torn and bleeding.

With the same firm but gentle gaze he said to her: “Do you wish to know who I am? Do you not know me? I am your Redeemer. Catherine, when will you cease to offend me? See how much I have suffered for you. You have grieved me enough, change your life."

Catherine began to weep bitterly, and Jesus, encouraging her, said: "Now begin to love me as much as you have offended me; and know that you have received this grace from me, on account of the Rosary you have been accustomed to recite in honor of my mother." And then he disappeared.

Catherine went in the morning to make her confession to St. Dominic, whose preaching on the Rosary had brought so marvelous a grace into her life. Giving to the poor all she possessed, from that day forward Catherine led so holy and joyful a life that she attained to great perfection.

It could now be said of her among the inhabitants of Rome that Catherine was indeed beautiful, but her beauty was no longer skin deep; her loveliness radiated from the depths of her soul.

The Most Holy Virgin often appeared to her; and Jesus himself revealed to St. Dominic, that this penitent had become very dear to him.

From the Glories of Mary, by St. Alphonsus Maria de Liguori.

As the century began anew, so did Catherine’s life. Catherine was a young woman possessing great beauty.

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