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Born in 1807 in Sallent, Barcelona, Spain, Anthony practiced his father’s trade of weaving cloth. In his spare time he learned Latin and printing. At twenty-two he entered the Seminary at Vich, and was ordained in 1835.

After an attempt to enter the Jesuits in Rome and join the missions, which was thwarted by poor health, he was advised to dedicate himself to the evangelization of his countrymen.

For ten years he preached missions and retreats throughout Catalonia. His zeal inspired others to join in his work and in 1849 he founded the Congregation of Missionary Sons of the Immaculate Heart of Mary. Known as "the Claretians," the institute flourished in Spain, the Americas and beyond.

Shortly after this great work was inaugurated, Fr. Claret was appointed Archbishop of Cuba. The task was one of exceptional difficulty. His efforts to bring about a much needed reform were vehemently resisted and several attempts were made upon his life. In one of those, he was seriously wounded.

Having resigned as Archbishop of Cuba in 1857, Anthony returned to Spain and was appointed confessor to Queen Isabel II. He firmly refused to reside at court, and only remained at court the time strictly necessary to accomplish his duties.

In the course of his life St. Anthony is said to have preached 10,000 sermons and published 200 books or pamphlets for the instruction and inspiration of the clergy and the faithful. While rector of the Escorial, he established a science laboratory, a museum of natural history, schools of music and languages, and other institutions.

Deeply united to God, he was endowed with supernatural graces, ecstasies, the gift of prophecy, and the miraculous healing of bodies.

In Rome, toward the end of his life, he helped promote the definition of papal infallibility.

Falling fatally ill in France, he went to his reward in the Cistercian monastery of Fontfroide on October 24, 1870. He was canonized in 1950.

 


 

 

 

Quote of the day

DAILY QUOTE for January 27, 2020

Pray with great confidence, with confidence based upon the g...

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January 27

 

Pray with great confidence, with confidence
based upon the goodness and infinite generosity of God
and upon the promises of Jesus Christ.
God is a spring of living water
which flows unceasingly into the hearts of those who pray.

St. Louis de Montfort


My Mother, I will stand with you on OCTOBER 10, 2020

Saint of the day

SAINT OF THE DAY

St. Angela Merici

Angela was much distressed when her sister suddenly died wit...

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St. Angela Merici

Angela de Merici was born in Desenzano, on the southwestern shore of beautiful Lake Garda, in northern Italy. Left an orphan at the age of ten with an older sister and a brother, they were taken in by an uncle living in the neighboring town of Salò.

Angela was much distressed when her sister suddenly died without the assistance of the last sacraments. At this time she had a vision, the first of many in her life, which set her mind at rest as to her sister’s salvation. In gratitude, she made a special consecration of herself to God, joined the Third Order of St. Francis and began to lead a life of great austerity.

After her uncle died when she was twenty, Angela moved back to Desenzano. Convinced of the need to instruct young girls in the Faith, she converted her home into a school. In a vision, she was shown that she would found a congregation for the instruction of young girls. Angela talked with fellow Franciscan tertiaries and friends who began to help her. Though petite in stature, Angela had looks, charm and leadership. Her school thrived and she was approached about starting a similar school in the larger city of Brescia where she came in contact with leading families whom she influenced with her great ideals.

In 1525 on a pilgrimage to Rome, Pope Clement VII, who had heard of her holiness, suggested she found a congregation of nursing sisters in Rome. But Angela who felt called elsewhere and shunned publicity, declined and returned to Brescia.

On November 25, 1535, with twelve other virgins, Angela Merici laid the foundations for her order for the teaching of young women, the first congregation of its kind in the Church. She placed her order under the protection of St. Ursula the patroness of medieval universities and popularly venerated as a leader of women. To this day her followers are known as the Ursulines.

Angela died only five years after establishing the Ursulines, and was canonized in 1807 by Pope Pius VII.

Photo by: Benoit Lhoest

Weekly Story

WEEKLY STORY

Many centuries ago, three young nuns lived together in a con...

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Our Lady and the Three Dresses

Many centuries ago, three young nuns lived together in a convent. Day after day, they took their meals together, they went to chapel together, and they prayed and sang together.

One day, their priest-confessor advised them that, as a preparation for the feast of the purification of Mary, they should recite the whole Rosary every day for forty days. The three nuns obediently complied.

On the night before that holy feast day, the Heavenly Mother appeared to the three nuns as they gathered in the choir. To the first of these three sisters she handed a rich garment, embroidered with gold. Holy Mary thanked her and blessed her.

She then handed to the second nun a much simpler garment, and also thanked her. Noticing the difference in the two garments, the second sister asked, "Oh Lady, why have you brought my sister a richer garment?" Mary Most Holy lovingly replied, "Because she has clothed me more richly with her prayers than you have done."

Mary then approached the third nun with a canvas garment. Being an observant young lady, this sister at once asked pardon for the half-hearted way in which she had prayed her rosaries.

A full year had passed when all three fervently prepared for the same feast, each saying her Rosary with great devotion. On the evening preceding the festival, Mary appeared to them in glory, and said to them: "Be prepared, for tomorrow you shall come to paradise."

The following morning dawned, full of promise. Each nun wondered if this would be her last day in this vale of tears. When evening came, would they retire to their modest cells once more, or did Holy Mary have something else in store for them?

The sisters related to their confessor what had occurred, and received communion in the morning. At the hour of compline (evening prayers) they saw again the most holy Virgin, who came to take them with her. Amid the songs of angels, one after the other sweetly expired.

From the Glories of Mary, by St. Alphonsus Maria de Liguori.

Many centuries ago, three young nuns lived together in a convent. Day after day, they took their meals together, they went to chapel together, and they prayed and sang together.

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