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St. Íñigo of OñaÍñigo was born in the eleventh century and was reportedly a native of Bilbao in northern Spain. Early in life he was drawn to a life of solitude and left to become a hermit.

Later, he traveled to Aragon where he received the religious habit of a monk at San Juan de Peña, eventually being elected Prior. His term completed, Íñigo was again drawn to the hermit’s “desert” and he resumed his hermetical life in the mountains of Aragon.

However, in 1029, King Sancho the Great sought out and was able to convince Íñigo to become the Abbot of a group of monks in a monastery at Oña. The monastery, founded by Sancho's father-in-law, was in need of reform, and he wanted Íñigo to lead the process.

The choice proved an excellent one. Under his ministration, the abbey grew rapidly in numbers and sanctity. Íñigo’s influenced extended far beyond the monastery walls though. He brought unity and accord to communities and individuals who had long been at bitter variance, and he tamed men of violent passions. When a severe drought threatened a total crop failure, God listened to the prayers of Íñigo and let the rains fall in abundance. On another occasion, he is said to have fed a great multitude with three loaves of bread.

He was two leagues from the abbey when he was seized with the malady which was to claim his life. He was carried home, and upon his arrival he asked that refreshments should be provided for the two young boys who had escorted the party with torches, but no one else had seen the boys. It is thought that they must have been angels that only Íñigo could see.

He died on June 1, 1057, and was canonized by Pope Alexander III about a century later.

 


 

 

 

Quote of the day

DAILY QUOTE for January 29, 2020

Let us not imagine that we obscure the glory of the Son by t...

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January 29

 

 Let us not imagine that we obscure the glory of the Son
by the great praise we lavish on the Mother; for
the more she is honored,
the greater is the glory of her Son.
There can be no doubt that
whatever we say in praise of the Mother gives equal praise to the Son.

St. Bernard of Clairvaux


My Mother, I will stand with you on OCTOBER 10, 2020

Saint of the day

SAINT OF THE DAY

St. Gildas the Wise

Gildas is considered to be the first British historian quote...

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St. Gildas the Wise

St. Gildas is considered to be the first British historian quoted by the Venerable Bede and Alcuin.

Gildas was born in Scotland of a noble British family. He was educated in Wales under St. Illtud and was the companion of St. Samson and St. Peter of Leon.

He embraced the monastic state and went to Ireland where he was ordained. From Armagh in Ireland he went to North Britain where his teaching was confirmed by miracles. On returning to Ireland at the invitation of King Ainmire, he strengthened the faith of many and built monasteries and churches.

After a pilgrimage to Rome, his love of solitude led him to a hermetical life on the Island of Houat off the coast of Brittany. Discovering his place of retreat, the Bretons convinced him to establish a monastery at Rhuys, on the mainland from whence he wrote his famous rebuke to five petty British kings and also to the clergy accusing them of sloth and simony. His writings indicate a man of no small culture, scriptural knowledge and sanctity.

He died on January 29, the day his feast is celebrated.

Weekly Story

WEEKLY STORY

Many centuries ago, three young nuns lived together in a con...

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Our Lady and the Three Dresses

Many centuries ago, three young nuns lived together in a convent. Day after day, they took their meals together, they went to chapel together, and they prayed and sang together.

One day, their priest-confessor advised them that, as a preparation for the feast of the purification of Mary, they should recite the whole Rosary every day for forty days. The three nuns obediently complied.

On the night before that holy feast day, the Heavenly Mother appeared to the three nuns as they gathered in the choir. To the first of these three sisters she handed a rich garment, embroidered with gold. Holy Mary thanked her and blessed her.

She then handed to the second nun a much simpler garment, and also thanked her. Noticing the difference in the two garments, the second sister asked, "Oh Lady, why have you brought my sister a richer garment?" Mary Most Holy lovingly replied, "Because she has clothed me more richly with her prayers than you have done."

Mary then approached the third nun with a canvas garment. Being an observant young lady, this sister at once asked pardon for the half-hearted way in which she had prayed her rosaries.

A full year had passed when all three fervently prepared for the same feast, each saying her Rosary with great devotion. On the evening preceding the festival, Mary appeared to them in glory, and said to them: "Be prepared, for tomorrow you shall come to paradise."

The following morning dawned, full of promise. Each nun wondered if this would be her last day in this vale of tears. When evening came, would they retire to their modest cells once more, or did Holy Mary have something else in store for them?

The sisters related to their confessor what had occurred, and received communion in the morning. At the hour of compline (evening prayers) they saw again the most holy Virgin, who came to take them with her. Amid the songs of angels, one after the other sweetly expired.

From the Glories of Mary, by St. Alphonsus Maria de Liguori.

Many centuries ago, three young nuns lived together in a convent. Day after day, they took their meals together, they went to chapel together, and they prayed and sang together.

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