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The socialist ideology can be summarized in twelve main points:

 

1. Metaphysical Egalitarianism

The foundation of the socialist ideology is metaphysical egalitarianism. This means that the idea of absolute equality is the fundamental assumption of the socialist view of man, society and the universe. All other principles of socialist ideology stem in one way or another from this fundamental principle.

 

2. Atheism

The assertion of an infinite, omnipotent and omniscient God clashes head-on with the principle of absolute equality. It must therefore be rejected. Indeed, what greater inequality is there than that between the Creator and simple creatures?

 

3. Materialistic Evolutionism

Socialism holds that there is an obscure force from which we cannot escape that leads humanity step by step to higher planes of social and moral being. History is a progressive process of purification. Socialism - in its full-fledged expression of communism - is the end of this process. Although socialism is the inevitable outcome of the forces underlying social, political, cultural and economic life, we can accelerate progress and evolution through class struggle, cultural warfare, or legislation. In fact, every new fashion, school curriculum, artistic style, law, and the like takes us closer to the socialist worldview. Every effort in this regard is progress; every contrary measure is a setback.1

 

4. Secularist and Materialistic Worldview

In the universe, there is nothing but matter. God, the soul, and the next life are only chimeras. Thus, what matters is to seek complete happiness in this life. With the help of science, socialists hold that all must strive toward the largest possible amount of pleasure, and avoid any effort or suffering. As a result, all obstacles to happiness must be removed, be they religious, moral, cultural, or any other. 2

 

5. Contempt for Religion: "The Opium of the People"

Karl Marx explained his contempt for religion in his famous expression that religion is "the opium of the people." 3 His staunch devotee Lenin developed this idea. He said: "Religion is opium for the people. Religion is a sort of spiritual booze [or hard liquor], in which the slaves of capital drown their human image, their demand for a life more or less worthy of man." 4

In his view, religion leads men astray from the present struggle because it promises them the prospect of a future life. By preaching restrictive moral standards, religion hampers absolute freedom. Above and beyond this, religion has a transcendental character which is totally incompatible with science, progress and the material world.

 

6. Secular Messianism

Socialism is much more than an ideology. It has a messianic character, i.e. it offers a message of "salvation;" not eternal salvation, but merely temporal "salvation," a "salvation" on this earth, achieved not by supernatural but human means. 5

 

7. From Idolatry of the State to Anarchy

Socialists teach that, at the present stage of human evolution, it is already possible to abolish private property, social hierarchy and the family. They seek to make the State the sole proprietor of all rights. This State, led by workers and peasants, will maintain complete equality among men. In the future, the universe and man will evolve in such a way that even the State will wither away. 6

 

8. Ethical and Cultural Relativism

There are no absolute truths or revealed morals that establish immutable standards of conduct that apply to everyone, everywhere, and always. Everything evolves, thus right and wrong, good and evil depend on the socio-economic development of mankind.

 

9. Social, Political and Economic Egalitarianism

All inequalities of wealth, prestige, or culture are unjust in themselves. Socialists especially attack the system of wage earning in which an employer, based on the right of private property, "exploits" workers, demanding part of the product of their work as his profit when it should be entirely theirs.

 

10. Abolition of Private Property and Class Struggle

The Communist Manifesto defines communism as the abolition of private property: "The theory of the Communists may be summed up in the single sentence: Abolition of private property." The Manifesto calls for the violent overthrow of all existing social institutions: "Let the ruling classes tremble at a Communist revolution. The proletarians have nothing to lose but their chains. They have a world to win. Workingmen of all countries, unite!"

 

11. Hostility to Marriage and the Traditional Family - Free Love

Sexual intercourse is simply a physiological function, like any other. 7 Consequently there is no reason for restricting it to marriage. 8 This applies even less to the "present form of marriage" between one man and one woman which is monogamous and indissoluble. 9

 

12. Education

Two questions and answers from Engels' Communist Catechism illustrate well the socialist view of education.

  • "18. What will be the course of this [communist] revolution?
  • "(viii) Education of all children, from the moment they can leave their mother's care, in national establishments at national cost. Education and production together." 10
  • "21. What will be the influence of communist [socialist] society on the family?
  • "It [communism/socialism] will transform the relations between the sexes into a purely private matter which concerns only the persons involved and into which society has no occasion to intervene. It can do this since it does away with private property and educates children on a communal basis, and in this way removes the two bases of traditional marriage – the dependence rooted in private property, of the women on the man, and of the children on the parents." 11

 

How Catholicism and Socialism Are Incompatible

The final conclusion could not be clearer: socialism is incompatible with Catholic doctrine, both because of its conception of the universe and man, and because it attacks two institutions which are pillars of Christian civilization: private property and the family.

This finding is timely and significant because some socialist proposals may seem to be "moderate" and therefore less alarming. However, by understanding the final goals of socialism, we see how it harms the family, private property rights, free initiative, legitimate interests, in a word, the true freedom of God's children.

If Catholics do not have a clear notion of the socialist ideology in all of its applications, they might feel tempted to compromise with some socialist initiatives that seem harmless at first glance. However, even the so-called moderate socialism is incompatible with Catholic doctrine and natural law. 

 


Footnotes

1. For instance, laws that protect traditional values - such as the family, private property and religion. [back]

2. Hence, the notorious "liberation movements": Women's Liberation Movement or Women's Lib (feminism as a form of socialism), homosexual "liberation” movements, Liberation Theology & so forth. [back]

3. "Die Religion ... Sie ist das Opium des Volkes" - Karl Marx. Kritik des hegelschen Staatsrecchts (Introduction to A Contribution to the Critique of Hegel's Philosophy of Right). [back]

4. V. I. Lenin. Socialism and Religion, article published in Novaya Zhizn, No. 28, December 3, 1905. From Marxists Internet Archive. (Our emphasis.) [back]

5. Just a sample: "Finland emerges [1905-06]with, proportionately, the largest socialist party in the world ... Ehrnrooth emphasizes the importance of emotional dynamics based on class hatred and envy, a sense of injustice, and the hope for salvation on this earth. Instead of waiting for a paradise in the afterlife, Finnish workers [i.e. socialists] saw salvation in the redistribution of property and in the distribution of property and incomes, the leveling of human conditions to create a classless new socialist society.” (Pekka Kalevi Hamalainen. Review of Power of the Word, Force of Hatred: Socialist Revolutionary Doctrines and Their Effect in the Finnish Workers' Movement, 1905-1914 by Jari Ehrnrooth. In The American Historical Review, Vol. 99, No. 4 (Oct., 1994), p. 1339 Available at http://www.jstor.org/stable/2168860) [back]

6. It will be the reign of anarchy, which these utopians conceive as being possible, without causing disorder or confusion. [back]

7. "In a book published in Leipsic we find the following thought expressed: 'Sexual impulse is neither moral nor immoral; it is simply natural like hunger and thirst. Nature knows nothing of morality.' But organized society is very far from recognizing the truth of this sentence." (August Bebel. Woman and Socialism, Chapter VII: Woman as a Sex Being, #1. Retrieved from

http://www.marxists.org/archive/bebel/1879/woman-Socialism/ch07.htm) [back]

8. "Woman may love whom she pleases and as long as she pleases. If she is not satisfied with one alliance, she may loose the knot and bless some other with her love. Married or unmarried, she is to enjoy perfect equality with the sterner sex.” (August Bebel, Die Frau, p. 192, as summarized by Fr. Cathrein, S.J, Socialism Exposed and Refuted. Retrieved from

http://www.archive.org/stream/socialismexposed00cathuoft/socialismexposed00cathuoft_djvu.txt [back]

9. "Man should be free to dispose of the strongest instinct of his nature as of every other natural instinct. The gratification of the sexual instinct is just in the same way the personal affair of every individual as is the satisfaction of any other natural appetite. Therefore no one is obliged to render an account of such gratification; nor is any uncalled-for intermeddler permitted to interfere in this matter. Prudence, education, and independence will facilitate and direct the proper choice. If disagreement, disappointment, or disaffection should arise, morality [!] demands a disruption of the unnatural and, consequently, immoral alliance." (August Bebel, Die Frau, p. 192, quoted by Fr. Cathrein, S.J, Socialism Exposed and Refuted, op., cit.)

http://www.archive.org/stream/socialismexposed00cathuoft/socialismexposed00cathuoft_djvu.txt [back]

10. Frederick Engels, The Principles of Communism (1847), q. 18. Retrieved from http://www.marxists.org/archive/marx/works/1847/11/prin-com.htm [back]

11. Frederick Engels, The Principles of Communism (1847), q. 21. Retrieved from http://www.marxists.org/archive/marx/works/1847/11/prin-com.htm [back]

 


 

 

 

 

Quote of the day

DAILY QUOTE for March 21, 2019

Virtue is nothing without the trial of temptation, for there...

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March 21

 

Virtue is nothing
without the trial of temptation, for
there is no conflict without an enemy,
no victory without strife.

Pope St. Leo the Great


SATAN V. the Immaculate Conception  SIGN!

Saint of the day

SAINT OF THE DAY

St. Enda of Aran

One of his sisters was married to Oengus the king of Munster...

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St. Enda of Aran

In the land evangelized by St. Patrick, there emerged in subsequent centuries a number of saints, who by the sanctity of their lives firmly established Christianity in Ireland. Among these is to be numbered the great St. Enda of Aran.

Enda was born in the sixth century to Oriel of Ulster, son of Conall Derg of Ergall, to whose principality he succeeded upon his death. One of his sisters was married to Oengus the king of Munster; another, the holy Fanchea, was abbess of a monastery. It was the pious exhortations of the latter that compelled him to leave the world and embrace the monastic life. He embarked on a pilgrimage to Rome to venerate the relics of the Apostles and was there ordained a priest.

Upon his return to Ireland, he built a church in Drogheda along the River Boyne and founded a religious community. From his brother-in-law, King Oengus of Munster, he obtained the grant of the wild and barren isle of Aran (Aranmore) in the Bay of Galway, where he founded the famous Monastery of Killeaney. Such was the fame acquired by this monastery and its abbot, that the island was called “Aran of the Saints”. Many of the great Irish saints had some connection with Aran and St. Enda: St. Brendan the Voyager, St. Kiaran of Clonmacnoise, St. Columba of Iona, St. Finnian of Clonard and others. So numerous were the pilgrims to Aran that St. Columba called it “The Rome of Pilgrims”.

Enda divided the island into ten parts, in each of which he built a monastery and over which he set superiors. His monastic settlement was known for its austerity, holiness and learning, and became a burning light of sanctity for centuries in Western Europe.

This father of Irish monasticism died in advanced old age and was buried on Aran Mor.

Weekly Story

WEEKLY STORY

A Bargain with Our Lady

From his sick bed, Ansaldo implored the Mother of God to hea...

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A Bargain with Our Lady


In the city of Doul, in France, lived a young cavalier named Ansaldo. This gentleman was trained in the arts of horsemanship and battle. As was common for those in Ansaldo’s line of work, he received a battle wound from an arrow, which entered so deep into the jaw-bone, that it was not possible to extract the iron.

After four years of suffering in this way, the afflicted man could endure the pain no longer. His affliction had made him very ill, a shadow of his former robust self. He thought he would again try to have the iron extracted. But before doing so, this time he decided to make a bargain with the Blessed Virgin.

From his sick bed, Ansaldo implored the Mother of God to heal his jaw and restore his health to him. In exchange for this great grace, he vowed to visit a sacred image of her in the city of Doul every year, and make an offering of a certain sum of money upon her altar if she granted this request.

He had no sooner made the vow than the iron, without being touched, fell out of his jaw and into his mouth.

The next day, ill as he was, he went to visit the sacred image. With a great deal of effort, the weakened, but hopeful man placed the promised gift upon the altar.

Immediately, he felt himself entirely restored to health.

Amazed by the quick maternal response of Mary Most Holy, Andsaldo never forgot his vow and returned every year to honor his part of their bargain.

From the Glories of Mary, by St. Alphonsus Maria de Liguori.

From his sick bed, Ansaldo implored the Mother of God to heal him and restore his health to him. In exchange for this great grace,

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