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by John Horvatt II

 

It is that time of the year again when students graduate from their high schools and colleges. The graduation ceremony is a rite of passage that is so much a part of our tradition. Commencement speakers call upon graduates to dream, hope and plan for the future. While such words may seem proper for these exuberant youth, they often go unheeded.

If I were to give a commencement speech, I should want to do something different. Generally, speakers either deliver a change-the-world pep talk or a face-the-world sermon.

My angle would address the act of graduation itself, for if handled well, the consequences will follow naturally. It is imperative to encourage graduates to do what they are called upon to do at this time: Graduates graduate. This means they pass from one stage of experience, proficiency, or development to another higher degree. It is a time of passage.

 

The Need to Graduate

This is one of the greater challenges of today’s graduates. Many are not graduating. They receive their diplomas with great pomp and ceremony but do not make that passage to the next stage of life. They stay frozen in immaturity, unwilling to make the decisions that require effort and grit.

After the graduation ceremony, they need to realize that they are no longer the high school or college students they once were. They should no longer play the same games, video or otherwise. They must assume new responsibilities. They must seriously think about their future. They should consider the state of the nation and the Church, which are in crisis.

 

Message to Graduates

My message to graduates would be: graduate!

Graduates! It does not matter if it is difficult. Just graduate.

Dare to be counter-cultural since our decadent culture encourages people not to graduate to anything higher in life. To graduate means avoiding frenetically intemperate lifestyles that destroys one’s future.

To graduate means not looking upon life as an uninterrupted sequence of fun and pleasure. Life is not a beach or a never-ending party; we must progress beyond the confines of our self-interest and gratification.

To graduate means progressing towards something higher. It requires making decisions that will affect the future of self and others. That is what I find so distressing about graduations. So many graduates have little idea of what they are graduating toward. They go to college without clearly defined goals or majors. They seem to desire to extend their high school days for four more years rather than prepare for the years ahead. They often leave college with little more than what they entered—save a great debt.

And so the second part of my message would be to propose three things toward which to graduate.

 

Graduating into Adulthood

The first thing toward which to graduate is true adulthood. Whether graduating from high school or college, all have reached the age of adult.
However, many mistake adulthood as merely reaching eighteen. Adulthood marks a special phase in life in which young people become legally responsible for their actions.

Adulthood means assuming responsibilities beyond self. Adults can create life…and destroy it. They might enter into marriage and constitute a family. Adults can own property and engage in business. They might serve the nation and even die for it.

But they can only do this properly if they leave behind childhood. There are many who refuse to become adults and continue as if children well into the twenties or thirties. These are not to be imitated but rejected.

Graduates must graduate to adulthood.

 

Looking for Meaning and Purpose

Secondly, graduates should graduate to meaning and purpose.

Responsibilities only make sense when life has meaning and purpose. And thus, graduates should assume values and embrace those high ideals that are worth more than life itself. They should desire to fight the evils of the day. They should look for those things that inspire dedication, loyalty, honor and dignity. This quest for meaning might be centered on family, school, community or church. They should embrace true freedom which leads to service, sacrifice and forgetfulness of self.

Graduates should embrace great causes in this time of great crisis. They should exercise Christian charity to all. This might include helping those who are less fortunate, combatting sin and immorality or setting standards of excellence that serve as models for all in society.

They must reject superficiality and hollow pretension; they must graduate to meaning and purpose beyond the confines of their own lives.

 

Understanding the Cause of Things

The final thing toward which to graduate must, in some way, involve knowing, loving and serving God. There is nothing higher in life since it is the reason for our existence. This is perhaps the most challenging graduation of all. It is undoubtedly the most counter-cultural since our world has lost its way and assumes the absence of God in society.

However, the search for meaning and purpose only make sense in the face of eternity and the existence of immortal souls. Graduates need to assume the presence of God in society. They should naturally seek what was once called a vocation or calling that fits them into the plan of God’s Providence.

Thus, while graduation should be a time of celebration, it should also be a time when young people are encouraged to ponder, discern and “graduate” to that higher calling that corresponds to the desires of their restless hearts. Thus, I would encourage graduates to abandon the modern noise and frenzy that leaves so many young people disoriented.

They should listen instead in silence to the voice of God’s grace calling them upward. It might lead to service, family, excellence, art or religious life. It should always aim to combat evil and seek out good and thus find true purpose in life. Now is the time to listen, for many are those who only find their way much later, if at all.

This would be my message to graduates. In the exuberance of their youth, I wish for them every success and dream that is within their reach. However, I would above all desire that they graduate—that they make that passage to adulthood. Let them seek out meaning and purpose. Let them find their way to God and listen for that vocation that He has called them to fill in society. I can think of no better way to start their next step toward the future.


 

Read:  Five Pieces of Advice for Graduates

 

 

Quote of the day

DAILY QUOTE for March 25, 2019

Virtues are formed by prayer. Prayer preserves temperance. P...

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March 25

 

Virtues are formed by prayer.
Prayer preserves temperance. Prayer suppresses anger.
Prayer prevents emotions of pride and envy.
Prayer draws into the soul the Holy Ghost,
and raises man to Heaven.

St. Ephrem the Syrian


SATAN V. the Immaculate Conception  SIGN!

Saint of the day

SAINT OF THE DAY

St. Lucy Filippini

Orphaned early in life, she was raised by her aristocratic a...

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St. Lucy Filippini

Lucy was born in 1672 in Tarquinia in Tuscany. Orphaned early in life, she was raised by her aristocratic aunt and uncle.

Her early inclination to piety was strengthened by a great seriousness of purpose and her remarkable gifts attracted the attention of the Cardinal-Bishop of the diocese, Marcantonio Barbarigo, who persuaded the young lady to take advantage of an institute for training teachers in Montefiasconi. Lucy excelled in the institute and won all hearts by her modesty and charity, her intense conviction of spiritual things, her common sense and her courage.

At the teachers' institute, Lucy met Blessed Rose Venerini, whose educational experience Cardinal Barbarigo had likewise recruited. In Montefiascone the two holy women trained schoolmistresses and co-founded the Maestre Pie or the Pious Matrons. Together they trained girls in the art of running a good home, weaving, embroidery, reading and Christian doctrine. Their work prospered. Both shared a tremendous gift for effective communication.

In 1707, at the express desire of Pope Clement XI, Lucy went to Rome and founded the first school of the Maestre Pie. The school flourished and children flocked to it from all over the region. Though only able to remain in Rome for six months, when Lucy left the Eternal City she was known as the “Maestra Santa”, the Holy School Mistress.

Unfortunately, the task sapped Lucy’s strength and she became seriously ill in 1726. Though she had good medical care, she never quite regained her health and died a most holy death on March 25, 1732, the day she had predicted.

Weekly Story

WEEKLY STORY

Why Doesn't God Answer My Prayer?

I turned to God, but God seems to remain deaf to me. Why is...

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Why Doesn't God Answer My Prayer?

Question:  I pray and pray, but I feel as if God is not listening. We always had a good, peaceful family life, but these last years have been tough. We don’t seem to be getting along and our finances have taken a turn for the worse.

I am so anxious about this situation that, not having anyone to turn to, I turned to God.

But God seems to remain deaf to me. Why is that? In addition, what do I say to certain people, agnostics and atheists, who laugh at prayer, saying it is nonsensical and only a figment of the imagination with no real value?

Answer:  God is faithful to His promises, and God promised to answer our prayers. “And I tell you, ask, and it will be given you; seek, and you will find; knock, and it will be opened to you. For every one who asks receives, and he who seeks finds, and to him who knocks it will be opened” (Luke 11:9–10).

If God promises to answer our prayers, He will do so infallibly. But in prayer there are two sides: he who asks and He Who gives.

Our part is to ask. How must we ask?

Saint Alphonsus Liguori, a Doctor of the Church, teaches in his book Prayer, the Great Means of Salvation that prayer must be persevering and humble.

So many times we hear people saying: “Oh, I used to ask God for this and that and the other, but He never gave it to me. Now, ten years later, how glad I am that He didn’t!”

One thing is certain: God will not fail to answer a humble and perseverance prayer. Whether He chooses to grant what we ask immediately or make us wait, we must trust that He, regardless of appearances, is doing us good. What we think is good and what He thinks is good may be two different things: “My thoughts are not your thoughts, nor your ways My ways” (Isa. 55:8), but here is where we must abandon ourselves to His beneficent will. Our part is to be patient, calm and, above all, faithful, because this is the time for testing and later will come the time for full enjoyment.


Answering Atheists and Agnostics
As for atheists and agnostics, their skepticism proceeds from the fact that they, respectively, deny God’s existence or deny men’s capacity to know God.

In this case, we can only express our regret over their ignorance of this Supreme Being, our omnipotent Creator and loving Savior.

We may direct them to a few sources that may help in their search for the truth of His existence. Atheism and agnosticism can only be sustained in ignorance or ill will because the evidence of God’s existence is overwhelming.

Moreover, God will not hide Himself from those who seek Him sincerely and unconditionally.

Another consideration pertaining to non-believers is this: If God were to grant us absolutely everything we ask at a moment’s notice, such people might start believing purely out of self-interest.

They would look at God as a wand-wielding wizard. And God Our Lord is infinitely more than that. He wants us to know, love, and serve Him for Himself so that He can treat us as children and heirs and grant us unending happiness in Heaven.

"My impression is that the Rosary is of the greatest value not only according to the words of Our Lady of Fatima, but according to the effects of the Rosary one sees throughout history. My impression is that Our Lady wanted to give ordinary people, who might not know how to pray, this simple method of getting closer to God."  Sister Lucia, one of the seers of Fatima.

 

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I turned to God, but God seems to remain deaf to me. Why is that? In addition, what do I say to certain people, agnostics and atheists,

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