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Is the red menace over?

by A. F. Philips

With the fall of the iron curtain and the end of the cold war, there was a general sense that Communism was over. Suddenly the “red menace”  had paled pink, many a Catholic affirming that the peace mentioned by Our Lady at Fatima was at hand.

One of the greatest mistakes of our era is to confuse the crumbling of the Soviet world with the end of Communist ideology. Of course, the fall of the Berlin Wall caused geopolitical changes around the world. But as Professor Plinio Correa de Oliveira, great Catholic leader of the 20th Century, often said, the red ideology only mutated. 

We need only look at the present convulsions in Venezuela, at the iron fist that continues to grip Cuba, to understand what Georg Hegel, German philosopher precursor to Marx, said that defeats are only “negative contradictions” 1 leading to reformulations.

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13th Congress of the Brazilian Communist Party

Indeed communist ideologues don’t go away. Rather, they make it an ongoing practice to re-hatch the failed experiments of the past. Like Talleyrand said of the return of the Bourbons, “they learned nothing and forgot nothing.”  2

Such is the case of Brazil; in 2010, Dilma Rousseff, previous Chief of Staff for Socialist president Luiz Inacio Lula, was elected as the country's first woman president. 

From an upper middle class family, as a young woman Rousseff joined several subversive guerrilla groups after reading Revolution Inside the Revolution by Regis Debray, a friend of Fidel Castro and Che Guevara.  She consequently served a prison term for her involvement with bank robberies, stolen vehicles and bombings.

Always connected with leftists groups, she made her way to the top position of her large, wealthy South American nation, considered the largest Catholic country on earth.

Rousseff makes no bones about her Marxist/Leninist ideals. In the photo she appears seated at the center of the conference table at the 13th Congress of the Brazilian Communist Party.

“Russia will spread its errors throughout the world”  3  - US not excluded

Indeed, Communism is not only alive, but as Our Lady predicted in 1917 a few months before Lenin’s Bolshevik Revolution, continues to spread its errors throughout the world.

Unfortunately, Our Lady’s prediction does not exclude our country, and the red menace is certainly making daring inroads. Socialist exploits, which only a few years ago would have been deemed unthinkable in America, are all over the news, often in our backyard. To cite only an example among many, the nation watches as a popular commercial chain, all-American, arts and crafts, inoffensive Hobby Lobby, fights to keep its doors open against a government mandate that requires the owners to violate their religious beliefs.

Presently the American family suffers a relentless siege, also a Communist tactic. Both Marx and Engels, leading communist theoreticians, affirm that if Communism is to succeed, there must be the abolition of the family. 4 Today, on our land as around the world, the family is attacked on all sides, from conception to natural death. All around the US, magistrates are redefining the very nature of the family, denying God’s definition of marriage as the union of one man and one woman, often against the express wish of the people.

Indeed Communism is far from dead. Whether red, orange, or pink, whether symbolized by the sickle, red star, or rose, whether it frowns, scowls or smiles, the red wolf is always the same scheming prowler stalking the God-given freedom of peoples and nations.

Let us study our era’s red menace so as to detect its mutating colors, methods and tactics; let us watch, and let us pray the Rosary of Our Lady, the powerful weapon has historically often defeated formidable odds.  

As we pray the Rosary, let us ask the Queen of Heaven for her ultimate victory, which she also predicted in Fatima: “In the end, my Immaculate Heart will triumph.”  – only then can the world have a chance at true peace.

 


 Notes:

1-https://www.abim.inf.br/o-perigo-vermelho/#.U2JmG_ldVvG O Perigo Vermelho by Jose Carlos Sepulveda da Fonseca [back to text]

2-Ibid [back to text]

3- https://www.americaneedsfatima.org/ANF-Articles/the-thir-apparition-of-our-lady-of-fatima-july-13-1917.html [back to text]

4- Father John A. Hardon, S.J. Archives – Communism [back to text]

5-https://www.americaneedsfatima.org/ANF-Articles/the-third-apparition-of-our-lady-of-fatima-july-13-1917.html [back to text]


 

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Quote of the day

DAILY QUOTE for July 23, 2019

Behold Jesus Christ crucified, Who is the only foundation of...

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July 23

 

Behold Jesus Christ crucified, Who is the only foundation of our hope;
He is our Mediator and Advocate; the victim and sacrifice for our sins.
He is goodness and patience itself;
His mercy is moved by the tears of sinners, and
He never refuses pardon and grace to those who ask it
with a truly contrite and humbled heart.

St. Charles Borromeo


PLEDGE REPARATION TO OUR LADY HERE!

Saint of the day

SAINT OF THE DAY

St. Bridget of Sweden

Her favorite son became entangled with Queen Joanna I who wa...

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St. Bridget of Sweden

Bridget was nobly born, her father was Birger, the governor of Upland in Sweden, and her mother, Ingeborg, was the daughter of the governor of East Gothland.

At fourteen she was married to young Ulf Gudmarsson, to whom she was happily married for twenty-eight years and had eight children, four boys and four girls, one of whom was St. Catherine of Sweden.

In 1335, she was appointed lady-in-waiting to King Magnus II’s bride, Blanche of Namur, and she spent years at court trying to reform Magnus’ weak, and at times, wicked ways, and the queen’s often well-meaning, but irresponsible, bend.

Though Bridget’s famous visions were already under way at this time, spanning subjects from personal hygiene to politics, she did not have great success with her royal “charges”, and was often seen as a “dreamer.”

After her husband’s death in 1344, she founded an order of women and another of men to support them spiritually. When her order was established, she traveled to Rome accompanied by her daughter Catherine and some disciples, to seek approval of her Rule. But she was never to return to her native Sweden.

In Rome, she worked to bring back the Papacy, then in the French city of Avignon, to the Eternal City. Her visions and prophecies, dealing with the burning political and religious issues of her time, continued and so increased that, alarmed, she submitted them to the direction of Canon Matthias of Linkoping who pronounced them to be of God. Peter, Prior of Alvastra, recorded these visions in Latin.

Her order was only approved by Pope Urban V in 1370.

In 1373 she made a pilgrimage to Jerusalem, with Catherine and three of her sons. At Naples, Charles, her favorite son, became entangled with Queen Joanna I who wanted to marry him despite both being already married (Joana thrice). Anguished, Bridget stormed heaven, and Charles, struck by a fever, after two weeks died in his mother’s arms.

Returning from Jerusalem, Bridget, already ailing, received the last rites from her faithful friend, Peter of Alvastra, and died on July 23 at the age of seventy-one.

Bridget was canonized in 1391, and is the patron saint of the Kingdom of Sweden. She is also considered one of the patron saints of Europe.

Weekly Story

WEEKLY STORY

In the days of yore, when travel must be had on foot or by h...

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The Virgin Mary Rewards a Bandit

In the days of yore, when travel must be had on foot or by horse, many were the dangers to be found along the roadways. Bandits plagued travelers and made their living by depriving others of their goods and often their very lives.

A young woman in the Papal States, who was very devout towards Mary, met in a certain place a chief of the bandits. Fearing some outrage, she implored him, for love of the most holy Virgin, not to molest her.

"Do not fear," he answered, "for you have prayed me in the name of the mother of God; and I only ask you to recommend me to her." Moved by the woman’s mention of the Blessed Virgin, the bandit accompanied her himself along the road to a place of safety.

The following night, Mary appeared in a dream to the bandit. She thanked him for the act of kindness he had performed for love of her. Mary went on to say that she would remember it and would one day reward him.

The robber, at length, was arrested, and condemned to death. But behold, the night previous to his execution, the blessed Virgin visited him again in a dream, and first asked him: "Do you know who I am?"

He answered, "It seems to me I have seen you before."

"I am the Virgin Mary," she continued, "and I have come to reward you for what you have done for me. You will die tomorrow, but you will die with so much contrition that you will come at once to paradise."

The convict awoke, and felt such contrition for his sins that he began to weep bitterly, all the while giving thanks aloud to our Blessed Lady. He asked immediately for a priest, to whom he made his confession with many tears, relating the vision he had seen. Finally, he asked the priest to make public this grace that had been bestowed on him by Mary.

He went joyfully to his execution, after which, as it is related, his countenance was so peaceful and so happy that all who saw him believed that the promise of the heavenly mother had been fulfilled.

From the Glories of Mary, by St. Alphonsus Maria de Liguori.

In the days of yore, when travel must be had on foot or by horse, many were the dangers to be found along the roadways.

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