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If Thou Art The Friend Of The World,
Thou Becomest The Enemy Of My Heart.

Photo of Sacred Heart of Jesus Statue

 

1. The Voice of Jesus. Woe to the world, My Child: woe to the heart that clings to its allurements and its vanities!

It is not enough to cast Satan out of thy heart, thou must also expel the world. If thou inwardly cherish the world, whatever else thou mayst do wholly to amend thyself, shall avail thee little.

For the world will continue to infect thy heart, will doubtless pervert, and finally betray thee into the power of the demon.

 

2. What is the world, except an inordinate or perverse love of pleasure, riches, honors, whereby its votaries are themselves corrupted and corrupt others?

If thou desirest to know, what thou oughtest to think of the world, consider what I Myself have judged of it. Behold! I passed through life doing good to all; I loved the enemies that persecuted Me; when fastened to the Cross, I prayed for those that crucified Me; but for the world I prayed not.

The world is of the devil, is wholly placed in wickedness, and cannot possess My Spirit: even as falsehood cannot be truth, as corruption cannot be purity.

 

3. The world is itself a proof, not only of the undeniable existence but even of the necessity of a hell.

What can there be in common between the world and My Heart, since the world, either openly or secretly, favors every vice; whilst My Heart breathes naught, except what is holy?

The world, in league with Satan, its prince, seeks for souls to destroy them forever; My Heart longs to save them all.

Thou canst, therefore, not serve the world and Me: for, if thou art the friend of the world, thou becomest the enemy of My Heart.

 

4. If thou art a votary of the world, thou wilt perish with the world: but if thou followest My Heart, thou wilt go into life everlasting.

If thou drivest the world, and the maxims of the world, from thy heart, so as to offer it wholly to Me, the offering will be pleasing and honorable to Me, and full of glory and merit to thyself. The Angels and the Saints will applaud the deed, and the world itself shall be compelled to admire the lofty heroism of thy mind.

Blessed is he, My Child, who withdraws his affections from the things of the world, and consecrates them to Me alone!

 

5. What findest thou in the world, on account of which thou wouldst love it? Behold! all that is in the world, is the desire of the flesh, the lust of the eyes, and the pride of life. And the end of all these is death and hell.

If, then, thou lovest the world, or the things which are of the world, thou takest into thy embrace everlasting perdition.

What good has the world done to thee, that thou wouldst devote thy affections to it? It has done, and never will do thee aught but evil. How, then, canst thou give thy heart to it?

Trust not, My Child, to the smiles and blandishments of the world; they show only a covert desire to deceive and destroy thee.

But hearken to the invitings of My Heart, which longs to save thee from the everlasting misfortunes which the world is preparing for thee.

 

6. If thou dost not forsake the world, the world will forsake thee, when thou art spent and worn out in its service; yea, it will laugh and mock at thy destruction; and, when thou standest most in need of help, thou shalt be alone and powerless.

Think frequently, which of the two, when thou art about to go into eternity, thou shalt rather wish to have followed, the world or Me.

Do freely, therefore, and meritoriously now, what, without merit, thou shalt be forced to do then.

Apply thyself to draw thy heart from the love of earthly things; and, by a complete disengagement from it, to triumph over the world.

Have confidence, My Child, I have overcome the world: if thou art willing, thou also canst vanquish it. So soon as thou shalt have conquered, I will give thee a most delightful place in My Heart.

 

7. The Voice of the Disciple. O Lord, how foolishly have I acted! How wickedly have I lived! A willing dupe, I have been misled by the false appearance of pleasure, of riches, of honor; I have forsaken Thee, to make myself a slave of the world, Thy enemy.

I have left the fountain of every good, to go down to the pestilential pool of the world. There made I myself drunk with poisonous draughts; I grew senseless, and, in my madness, I cast aside everything.

I became forgetful of Thee, my God and my all; I gave myself wholly to the world; and in its service, I unhallowed Thy gifts, my external senses, and the inward powers of my soul.

Alas! I became exceedingly guilty: my soul was filled with iniquity: I drew myself nigh to hell.

Thy wrath came upon me, and Thy terrors troubled me, so that night and day I was wretched.

 

8. Alas! good Jesus! even after seized with a great dread of Thy judgment and fear of hell I had resolved to lead a good life, into what fatal illusion did I fall! how banefully did I go astray!

I divided my heart between Thee and the world: I wished, at one and the same time, to serve Thee and the world.

O! how great an insult did I offer to Thee, when I placed Thee on an equality with the world! I pleased neither the world nor Thee: and, meanwhile, I was most wretched, because, not being satisfied with the world, nor with Thee, I found true happiness in neither.

But now that Thou didst open my eyes, and move my heart, behold! Lord Jesus, I will serve Thee alone: I give my whole heart to Thee forever.

Take out of my heart, I beseech Thee, all affection for the world: change for me all its apparent sweets into real bitterness.

So fill me with the delight of Thy love, that the world, with all its vanities, becomes tasteless to me.

 


“Voice of Jesus” is taken from Arnoudt’s “Imitation of the Sacred Heart”, translated from the Latin of J.M. Fastre; Benziger Bros. Copyright 1866

 

 

Quote of the day

DAILY QUOTE for January 28, 2020

In the realm of evil thoughts none induces to sin as much as...

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January 28

 

In the realm of evil thoughts  
none induces to sin  
as much as do thoughts 

that concern the pleasure of the flesh. 

St. Thomas Aquinas


My Mother, I will stand with you on OCTOBER 10, 2020

Saint of the day

SAINT OF THE DAY

St. Thomas Aquinas

Falling to his knees he begged God for the virtue of integri...

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St. Thomas Aquinas

Thomas Aquinas was born about 1225 in the castle of Rocca Secca, into the noble lineage of the family of Aquino. His father, Landulf, was a knight and his mother, Theodora, a countess.

At age five Thomas was sent to the Benedictines of Monte Cassino as an oblate and remained until thirteen. He was studious, meditative and devoted to prayer, and frequently asked the question, “What is God?”

Around 1236, the Abbot convinced Thomas’ father that such a talented lad should go to Naples to study, and there he shone academically. In Naples Thomas came under the influence of the Dominican Order of Preachers, and at nineteen was received into the Order.

His family was indignant because he had chosen a mendicant order. At Theodora’s orders two of his soldier-brothers imprisoned him in a castle. They even introduced a temptress into Thomas’ chamber whom he drove away with a brand snatched from the fire. Falling to his knees he begged God for the virtue of integrity of mind and body.  Falling asleep, he dreamt of two angels who girded him with a white girdle saying, “receive the girdle of perpetual virginity”, and he was never tempted by the flesh again – for which he is called “The Angelic Doctor”. He spent the two years of his captivity praying, studying and writing.

Finally his mother relented. Returning to the Dominicans they found that he had made so much progress on his own, that he was soon ordained. Sent to study in Cologne under St. Albert Magnus, his great size and silence earned him the encomium of “the Dumb Ox” but hearing his brilliant defense of a difficult thesis, St. Albert responded, "We call this young man a dumb ox, but his bellowing in doctrine will one day resound throughout the world."

Thomas received his doctorate in Theology in Paris, and went on to teach, preach, and write extensively. Between 1259 and 1268 he was in Italy as Preacher General teaching in the school of selected scholars attached to the Papal court. About 1266 he began writing the most famous of all his works, The Summa Theologiae.

In 1269 he was back in Paris, where he was a friend and counselor of King St. Louis IX. In 1272 he was recalled to Italy. On the feast of St. Nicholas the following year he received a revelation that caused him to leave his great Summa unfinished saying, “…all that I have written seems like so much straw after the things that have been revealed to me.”

Becoming ill, Thomas died on March 7, 1274 at fifty years of age. He was canonized in 1323 and declared a Doctor of the Church by Pope St. Pius V in 1567.

Weekly Story

WEEKLY STORY

Many centuries ago, three young nuns lived together in a con...

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Our Lady and the Three Dresses

Many centuries ago, three young nuns lived together in a convent. Day after day, they took their meals together, they went to chapel together, and they prayed and sang together.

One day, their priest-confessor advised them that, as a preparation for the feast of the purification of Mary, they should recite the whole Rosary every day for forty days. The three nuns obediently complied.

On the night before that holy feast day, the Heavenly Mother appeared to the three nuns as they gathered in the choir. To the first of these three sisters she handed a rich garment, embroidered with gold. Holy Mary thanked her and blessed her.

She then handed to the second nun a much simpler garment, and also thanked her. Noticing the difference in the two garments, the second sister asked, "Oh Lady, why have you brought my sister a richer garment?" Mary Most Holy lovingly replied, "Because she has clothed me more richly with her prayers than you have done."

Mary then approached the third nun with a canvas garment. Being an observant young lady, this sister at once asked pardon for the half-hearted way in which she had prayed her rosaries.

A full year had passed when all three fervently prepared for the same feast, each saying her Rosary with great devotion. On the evening preceding the festival, Mary appeared to them in glory, and said to them: "Be prepared, for tomorrow you shall come to paradise."

The following morning dawned, full of promise. Each nun wondered if this would be her last day in this vale of tears. When evening came, would they retire to their modest cells once more, or did Holy Mary have something else in store for them?

The sisters related to their confessor what had occurred, and received communion in the morning. At the hour of compline (evening prayers) they saw again the most holy Virgin, who came to take them with her. Amid the songs of angels, one after the other sweetly expired.

From the Glories of Mary, by St. Alphonsus Maria de Liguori.

Many centuries ago, three young nuns lived together in a convent. Day after day, they took their meals together, they went to chapel together, and they prayed and sang together.

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