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Voice Of Jesus 23: Of Death

Death Is A Good Counselor, My Child;

Photo of Sacred Heart of Jesus Statue

 

 

1.) The Voice of Jesus. As I live, I desire not the death of the sinner, but that he be converted and live.

 

If the sinner do penance for all the sins which he has committed, and keep all My commands, living, he shall live, and not die.

 

The ungodliness of the ungodly shall not hurt him, in whatever day he shall turn away from his ungodliness: the sins which he has sinned shall not be imputed to him.

 

Why, then, art thou troubled, My Child, or why fearest thou so immoderately? Am I like a man, that I should lie or change? Did I say it, and shall I not do it? Did I promise, and shall I not make it good? Did I swear, and shall I not keep My word?

 

Why dost thou doubt, man of little faith? Amen: heaven and earth shall pass away, but My words shall not pass away.

 

2.) Behold, God, My heavenly Father, who, for thy salvation, did not spare His only Son, but delivered Him up for thee, no less than for the rest: did He not give thee, together with Him, all other things, pardon, perseverance, Paradise, every blessing?

 

Through Me, therefore, the only-begotten Son of God, thou art become rich in all things, so that thou canst be wanting in no grace. For, where sin abounded, there grace did more abound.

 

Go then, with confidence, to the throne of grace, that thou mayst obtain those things that are needful to thee.

 

3.) My Child, I came down from heaven, that I might snatch thee from the jaws of hell: all the days of My life, I was in suffering, that thou mightst be happy through all eternity; I was willingly condemned to die, that thou mightst be free from everlasting death: and all these things I did for thee when thou wast My enemy; what, then, will I not do, or what can I refuse, when thou lovest Me?

 

If thy sins affrighten thee, know, My Child, that My infinite merits are infinitely more powerful to save thee, if thou art willing, than thy sins to destroy thee, if thou art uneasy.

 

If, by reason of thy sins, thou standest in dread of My judgment, call to mind, that I, Thy Savior, who, even at the right hand of God, My Father, intercede for thee, shall be thy Judge.

 

4.) Enlarge, therefore, thy heart in the Holy Spirit, whom thou didst receive in the Sacrament of divine mercy. That Spirit of love, that consuming fire, will destroy the remnant of thy sins, and cast out all inordinate fear.

 

Hadst thou been an exceedingly great sinner, like the thief crucified with Me; hadst thou, like Paul, persecuted Me; hadst thou even denied Me, like Peter: behold, if once thou confessest rightly, so as to enjoy the effect of the Sacrament, all thy sins are forgiven thee.

 

5.) Why art thou sad, My Child? and why dost thou disquiet thyself? Thinkest thou that I am a harsh master, whom it is difficult to satisfy?

 

Thou art mistaken, Child; thou art greatly deceived. For, behold, am I not a Father, whose Heart is goodness itself? Dost thou not know this? Hast thou not experienced it?

 

Do not then dishonor Me; do not revile Me, by attributing to Me things which are so wrongful.

 

6.) My Child, thou hast not received the spirit of bondage again in fear: but thou hast received the spirit of adoption of the sons of God, whereby thou mayst love and address Me: Abba, Father!

 

Do not, then, fear, Child; do not, by worrying thyself uselessly, lose the time which thou oughtest to spend happily in loving Me; for I do not require anguish, but love.

 

Have confidence, My Child, that thy sins have been forgiven thee. Do now strive to love Me the more, the more I have forgiven thee.

 

7.) The voice of the Disciple. O Jesus! my love! my life! How delightful to me, how sweet are the words thou utterest from Thy Heart!

 

O Lord, My God! Thou didst wash not my feet, not my hands, not my head alone, but my soul, my whole self, and that with Thy own blood.

 

Behold, Thou didst cast my sins into the depth of a sea, into the abyss of the mercy of Thy Heart, where they have disappeared from Thy sight.

 

Jesus! how can I ever be unmindful of Thy mercies, whereby Thou hast thus restored me to life!

 

I will sing Thy mercies, Lord, forever: I will praise the goodness of Thy Heart for evermore.

 

8.) Bless the Lord, O my soul, and let all that is within me bless His Sacred Heart. Yea, bless the Lord, O my soul, and never forget all He has done for thee; Who forgives all thy iniquities – who heals all thy diseases.

 

He has not dealt with us according to our sins, nor has He rewarded us according to our iniquities: but He has blotted them out according to the multitude of the mercies of His Heart.

 

As a father has pity on his children, so has the Lord had pity on us; because He is good, because His mercy endures forever.

 

9.) Love the Lord, O my soul, love Jesus, love Him much; because He has forgiven thee much.

 

Let them love less to whom He has forgiven less: but do thou, by the greatness of thy love, strive to make a suitable return for the greatness of His bounty.

 

Yea, O most sweet Jesus, I will love Thee with all my strength: nor will I henceforward pass my time in vexing my heart, Thy kingdom now; but I will employ it better, more usefully to me, more pleasingly to Thee: Thy love shall ever be my occupation. In peace in the self-same, will I take my rest and repose.

 

“Voice of Jesus” is taken from Arnoudt’s “Imitation of the Sacred Heart”, translated from the Latin of J.M. Fastre; Benziger Bros. Copyright 1866f thou art uneasy.

 

Quote of the day

DAILY QUOTE for September 30, 2020

Either we must speak as we dress, or dress as we speak. Why...

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September 30

 

Either we must speak as we dress,
or dress as we speak.
Why do we profess one thing and display another?
The tongue talks of chastity, but the whole body reveals impurity.

St. Jerome


My Mother, I will stand with you on OCTOBER 10, 2020

Saint of the day

SAINT OF THE DAY

St. Jerome

He became seriously ill and had a dream that profoundly impa...

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St. Jerome

St. Jerome is a Father and Doctor of the Church who is best known for his compiling of the Vulgate version of the Catholic Bible, now the standard edition in use.

He was born about the year 347 at Stidon, near Dalmatia, to wealthy Christian parents. Initially educated at home, his parents soon sent him to Rome to further his intense desire for intellectual learning. There he studied and excelled at grammar, Latin and Greek, rhetoric, and philosophy, and lived a deeply materialistic life alongside his fellow students. Jerome was baptized in his late teen years, as was the custom at the time, around the time he finished his schooling.

After spending many years in travel and, notably, discovering and investigating his extreme interest in monasticism, Jerome’s life took a sudden turn. In the spring of 375, he became seriously ill and had a dream that profoundly impacted him, because in it he was accused of being a follower of Cicero – an early Roman philosopher – and not a Christian. Afterwards, Jerome vowed never to read any pagan literature again – not even the classics for pleasure. He separated himself from society and left to become a hermit in the desert so as to atone for his sins and dedicate himself to God. Having no experience of monasticism and no guide to direct him, Jerome suffered greatly and was often quite ill. He was plagued terribly with temptations of the flesh and would impose harsh penances on himself to repress them. While there, he undertook the learning of Hebrew, as an added penance, and was tutored by a Jewish convert. When controversy arose among his fellow monks in the desert concerning the bishopric of Antioch, Jerome left to avoid the tension of the position he found himself in.

Having developed a reputation as a great scholar and ascetic, Jerome was ordained to the priesthood by the persuasion of Bishop Paulinus, on the condition that he be allowed to continue his monastic lifestyle and not be obliged to assume pastoral duties.

In 382, he was appointed as secretary to Pope Damascus, who urged him to undertake a Latin translation of the Bible from its original Greek and Hebrew origins.

After the death of the Holy Pontiff, Jerome left Rome for the Holy Land with a small group of virgins who were led by his close friend, Paula. Under his direction, Paula established a monastery for men in Bethlehem and three cloisters for women. Jerome remained at this monastery until his death around A.D. 420, only leaving occasionally for brief trips. He is the patron saint of librarians and translators.

Weekly Story

WEEKLY STORY

In his book, The Secret of the Rosary, St. Louis de Montfort...

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The Rosary, the Devil and the Queen

In his book, The Secret of the Rosary, St. Louis de Montfort relates that Blessed Thomas of St. John was a great devotee of the Holy Rosary of the Blessed Virgin Mary. As such, he was known for his powerful, moving sermons on the Rosary, which led people to adopt this devotion to their great benefit.

Furiously jealous of the holy man’s success with souls, the devil began to so torture Thomas that he fell sick, and was so ill for so long that the doctors gave up on saving his life.

One night, when the poor man thought he was near death, the devil appeared to him in a hideous form, coward that he is, seeking to frighten Thomas into despair.

But, making an effort, the good priest turned to a beautiful picture of Our Lady near his bed crying out with all his heart and strength:

“Help me, save me, my sweet, sweet Mother!”

No sooner had he pronounced these words, the picture came alive and extending her hand, the heavenly Lady laid it reassuringly on the priest’s arm, saying:

“Do not be afraid, Thomas my son, here I am and I am going to save you. Get up now and go on preaching my Rosary as you did before. I promise to shield and protect you from your enemies.”

No sooner had Our Lady pronounced these words, than the devil fled in a hurry. Getting up, Thomas found that he was perfectly healed. 

Thanking the Blessed Mother with tears of joy, Blessed Thomas again went about preaching the Holy Rosary, now with renewed favor and gumption, and his apostolate and his sermons were enormously successful. 

St. Louis the Montfort concludes this story saying, “Our lady not only blesses those who say her Rosary, but also abundantly rewards those who, by their example, inspire others to say it as well.”

 


 

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In his book, The Secret of the Rosary, St. Louis de Montfort relates that Blessed Thomas of St. John was a great devotee of the Holy Rosary of the Blessed Virgin Mary.

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