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“And there was a great battle in heaven: Michael and his angels fought with the dragon, and the dragon fought, and his angels. And they prevailed not…”  (Apocalypse 12:7)
 

Click here for:  Prayers to Saint Michael 

 

Watch this marvelous video of Mont Saint Michel:

 

Off the coast of Normandy, France, there is a marvelous rocky island where Saint Michael appeared to Saint Aubert, Bishop of Avranches in 708. Nowhere is Saint Michael’s presence more keenly felt than at Mont Saint Michel.

 

Treasure of Christendom

Mont Saint Michel - Normandy FranceOnce known as the Tomb on the Hill, this medieval abbey-fortress was built in honor of Saint Michael. Today, pilgrims can still admire the marvels of this dazzling monument which typifies the sublime virtues of the warrior-monk, of bravery and fortitude.

Its lofty steeple speaks of the monastic life and sacrality; of something higher, something heavenly, something more than mere stone. Its beauty transcends stone and mortar and lifts the soul to a higher plain. What is this spirit? Did the Archangel bestow some of his spiritual beauty upon this mount?

 

Something Spiritual

Somehow, the monument allows us to form a supernatural glimpse of Saint Michael. There is something spiritual about it; something sublime that transcends art, and is apparent to those with refined spiritual perception.

If this monument reveals the soul of the warrior-monk, who prays and fights, we can understand how much more beautiful is the spirit of an Angel.

The spirit of Saint Michael is more beautiful than the soul of a monk, because he is a “monk” in the immense monastery of Heaven, where there is a perfect Abbess, Our Lady, and above the Abbess, an infinitely perfect Abbot, God Our Lord.

 

Devotion to Warrior Angels

St Micheal StatueSaint Michael the Archangel. In the Middle Ages, men had a great devotion to Angels, especially the warrior Angels. They understood how the Angels waged the first battle against evil in history.

The chief knight was Saint Michael. Therefore, the spirit of the Crusades, the spirit of Chivalry, and the spirit of this mount reflect Saint Michael.

Now, let’s visit the abbey, a fortress-Church. One can imagine monks chanting the office and one can also imagine knights in full armor, resisting the enemy on the walls.

Picture, if you can, magnificent libraries… monks studying; in another hall, artisans writing gold-leafed gothic letters on parchment, or cutting stones to decorate an unfinished pillar.

Suddenly, a trumpet blast cuts the silent air. At once, the order of Chivalry that resides here responds. Knights rush to the gates, repel the enemy and defend the monks.

The island is a synthesis of prayer, study, recollection, art and combat. All of these qualities stem from a rich spiritual life.

 

Think about God

The finest location is given to the chapel. The chapel sets the tone for everything else. There are places also dedicated to war and study. But what unites the buildings and gives the island unity is the Church steeple. It is like a paper weight resting on other papers and seems to say: “the wind will not blow these buildings away. They will stay right where they are.” And the Church steeple points to Heaven, beckoning the faithful to think about God.

 

Click here for:  Prayers to Saint Michael

 


Editor’s note:
This commentary was inspired by a talk given by Prof. Plinio Corrêa de Oliveira about Saint Michael.
This article was first published at www.tfpstudentaction.org

 

 

 

Quote of the day

DAILY QUOTE for April 22, 2021

Mary was raised to the dignity of Mother of God rather for s...

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April 22

 

Mary was raised to the dignity of Mother of God
rather for sinners than for the just, since
Jesus Christ declares that
He came to call not the just, but sinners.

St. Anselm

 
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Saint of the day

SAINT OF THE DAY

St. Theodore of Sykeon

Endowed with the gift of prophecy and miracles, on a second...

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St. Theodore of Sykeon

Born in the Roman Galatian town of Sykeon in Asia Minor, Theodore was the son of a woman of ill repute, who kept an inn along the imperial highway.

As a child, he was so given to prayer that he would often give up a meal to spend time in church. From an early age he shut himself up first in the cellar of his mother’s house and then in a cave beneath a disused chapel. Later, for a time, seeking to further escape the world, he sought solitude on a mountain.

On a pilgrimage to Jerusalem Theodore assumed a monk’s habit, and though only eighteen years of age, was ordained a priest by his own bishop. His life was most austere, wearing an iron girdle about his body and only sparingly partaking of vegetables.

Endowed with the gift of prophecy and miracles, on a second pilgrimage to the Holy Land, he obtained abundant rain after a severe drought.

Theodore founded several monasteries, and ruled as abbot in Sykeon. He was consecrated Bishop of Anastasiopolis, though he deemed himself totally unfitted. After ten years he succeeded in relinquishing his post and retired to Sykeon.

From Sykeon he was recalled to Constantinople to bless the emperor and the senate and there healed one of the Emperor’s sons of a skin disease, reputedly leprosy.

Theodore had a great devotion to St. George and did much to propagate devotion to him.

He died in Sykeon on April 22, 613.

Weekly Story

WEEKLY STORY

In the mountainous region of Trent in Germany, there lived a...

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The Robber Who Stole Heaven

In the mountainous region of Trent in Germany, there lived a notorious robber who made his living by bringing misfortune on others. His occupation being what it was, he would only increase his property by decreasing that of his victims.

One day, he was admonished by a local religious to change his course of life and thereby insure his eternal salvation. The only answer the robber gave was that for him there was no remedy.

"Do not say so," said the religious, "do what I tell you. Fast on each Saturday in honor of the Virgin Mary, and on that day of the week do no harm to anyone. She will obtain for you the grace of not dying in God’s displeasure.”

The robber thought to himself, “This is a small price to pay to insure my salvation; I will do as this holy man has prescribed.” He then obediently followed the religious’ advice, and made a vow to continue to do so. That he might not break it, from that time on he traveled unarmed on Saturdays.

Many years later, our robber was apprehended on a given Saturday by the officers of justice, and that he might not break his oath, he allowed himself to be taken without resistance. The judge, seeing that he was now a gray-haired old man, wished to pardon him.

Then the truly miraculous occurred. Rather than jump for joy thanking the judge for his leniency, the old robber, said that he wished to die in punishment of his sins. He then made a public confession of all the sins of his life in that same judgment hall, weeping so bitterly that all present wept with him.

He was beheaded, a death reserved for the nobility, rather than hanged. Then his body was buried with little ceremony, in a grave dug nearby.
Very soon afterwards, the mother of God came down from Heaven with four holy virgins by her side. They took the robber’s dead body from that place, wrapped it in a rich cloth embroidered with gold, and bore it themselves to the gate of the city.

There the Blessed Virgin said to the guards: "Tell the bishop from me, to give an honorable burial, in such a church to this dead person, for he was my faithful servant." And thus it was done.

All the people in the village thronged to the spot where they found the corpse with the rich pall, and the bier on which it was placed. And from that moment on, says Caesarius of Heisterbach, all persons in that region began to fast on Saturdays in honor of she who was so kind to even a notorious robber.

From the Glories of Mary, by St. Alphonsus Maria de Liguori.

In the mountainous region of Trent in Germany, there lived a notorious robber who made his living by bringing misfortune on others. 

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