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Header-The Bottom Line on Marriage

 John Horvat II 

 

There are those who claim that the notion of traditional marriage should be "redefined." In fact, in the summer of 2015, the Supreme Court took it upon itself to “redefine” marriage in opposition to God’s law. In doing so, the highest court in the land put our nation at great risk.

There are plenty of moral arguments that deal with the need to defend traditional marriage. However, many refuse to recognize the existence of an objective morality. For these, perhaps the best way to explain the importance of this essential institution is in terms that people today understand best, that is, economic terms. If one can reduce things to the bottom line, it seems people sit up and take notice.

FamilyAnd so the bottom line is this: a wedding is more than just a social celebration; it is also a major economic event. It signals the entry of a new entity - the family - into economy that naturally favors balanced production and consumption. By its very nature, the family expands the economy by celebrating the coming of life since children are seen as blessings, not burdens.

Economy was born around the warm hearth of the home. The etymology of the word means "household management." Thus, the family is the ideal school of temperance that teaches its members duty and responsibility, self-sacrifice and joyful celebration. If we want to return to some kind of prosperity, the family based on traditional marriage is indispensable. There is no substitute.

However, a family is not just any grouping of people in the same house. It presupposes a complementary union of spouses that creates a climate of intense affinity, affection, and stability that allow the ideal psychological conditions for their children to develop. The family has that creative restraint that at once limits, yet challenges. It succors, yet makes demands. It provides both support for shortcomings and incentives to excel.

The traditional family, especially the large family, is rich in solutions since it unites past, present and future. The individual can draw upon family traditions. Past figures can serve as role models. The future can be built upon family wealth, honor and reputation.

Such concepts make the family more than just a single set of relationships, but rather a world of relationships spanning generations. It is an institution uniting personalities, property, names, rights, principles, and histories and therefore favoring stable growth. Because it furthers the well-being of all society and economy, it is in the interest of the State to favor this notion of the family, to defend it, and to bestow benefits upon it.

That is why even the Supreme Court cannot actually "redefine" marriage. Relationships outside of traditional marriage define themselves by their lack of restraint, their defiance of morality. In the case of homosexual "marriage," the very name highlights the idea of sexual gratification over any other considerations. Such unions turn the procreative function into a non-creative one.

It turns natural fecundity into an unnatural sterility.

Indeed, traditional marriage is so fecund that those who would frustrate its end must do violence to nature to prevent the birth of children by using contraception. On the contrary, same-sex unions are so sterile that those who would circumvent nature must employ costly and artificial means or employ surrogates to bring about adoptive children. The natural state of marriage is to create a world of natural blood relationships to advance society. Other unions cannot do this and come to be reduced to mere conventions used to advance the individual's pursuit of pleasure.

Without the traditional family, we experience the lack of restraint and temperance so needed to keep economy in balance.

RTO BookIn my book, Return to Order: From a Frenzied Economy to an Organic Christian Society-Where We've Been, How We Got Here, and Where We Need to Go, I speak about what I call “frenetic intemperance” in our economy where instant gratification is the order of the day.

We now have a credit-card economy where we must have everything instantly, regardless of the consequences. This has largely happened because the family - that ideal school of temperance - is no longer functioning as it should and schools of intemperance are given free rein.

The bottom line is that the heart and soul of economy is found in the family based on indissoluble marriage. Strong families lead to strong economies. Frenzied lifestyles cause frenzied markets with their restless spirit of frenetic intemperance. That is the long and short of it.
 


John Horvat II is a scholar, researcher, educator, international speaker, and author.  His writings have appeared worldwide including in The WallStreet Journal as well as other publications and websites.  For more than two decades he has been researching and writing about the socio-economic crisis inside the United States that has culminated in the ground-breaking release of his new book, "Return to Order." 

 

 

Quote of the day

DAILY QUOTE for April 23, 2019

The prayer of the sick person is his patience and his accept...

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April 23

 

The prayer of the sick person is
his patience and his acceptance of his sickness
for the love of Jesus Christ.
Make sickness itself a prayer, for there is none
more powerful, save martyrdom!

St. Francis de Sales

 
SIGN Against this Blasphemy of the

HEARTS OF JESUS AND MARY

 

Saint of the day

SAINT OF THE DAY

St. George

George loudly proclaimed himself a follower of Christ before...

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St. George

Though the story of St. George is intertwined with legend, especially the account of him slaying a dragon, the historicity of his life is certain.
He was of Greek origin, seemingly of a noble, Christian family. His father was Gerondios, from Capaddocia, a prominent officer in the Imperial army. His mother was Polychronia, from the city of Lyda, now in Israel.

As a youth, he lost first his father and then his mother, after which he enlisted in the Roman army under Emperor Diocletian. The latter favored him in honor of his father’s service, and George was made an Imperial Tribune.

By imperial edict, Roman soldiers were forbidden to practice Christianity. Notwithstanding this prohibition, George loudly proclaimed himself a follower of Christ before the Emperor Diocletian and his fellow soldiers. Upset at the news, the Emperor offered George an abundance of earthly goods in exchange for his Christian Faith, but George was unmoved. He endured various tortures and was finally beheaded. The Empress Alexandra was converted by his courageous example, and some interpret that while the dragon often depicted being slain by St. George is the pagan Roman might, the lady in the background is the Empress.

Devotion to St. George spread throughout Asia Minor, and already early in the fourth century churches were being dedicated to his honor.

Throughout the history of Christian battles there have been reports of St. George’s heavenly assistance, Richard I of England and other Crusaders also confirming such intercession. It is not known how St. George was chosen as patron of England, though it is certain that his fame had reached the isle long before the Norman Conquest.

Weekly Story

WEEKLY STORY

In the dead silence that ensued, all present heard a voice c...

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The Miraculous Christ de la Vega

There was once in the city of Toledo, Spain a soldier, Diego Martinez, and a young woman, Ines de Vargas, who were in love.

Diego was called to fight in Flanders, so, at Ines’ insistence, before a crucifix known as The Christ de la Vega, Diego solemnly swore to marry her on his return.

With Diego gone, Ines felt lost and alone, and often sought solace at the foot of the Christ who had witnessed their solemn engagement.

Years went by, Ines always on the lookout. One day, at the head of a returning cavalry, she beheld her fiancé. She screamed and rushed to meet him, but he feigned not to know her, and passed on.

Successful in war and prowess, he had not only been promoted to captain, but had been knighted by the King, and no longer considered Ines a worthy prospect.

Tears being of no avail, the spurned young woman took her case before the governor of Toledo, Don Pedro Ruiz de Alarcon, claiming that Diego Martinez had sworn to marry her. But the captain denied such a vow, and with no witnesses, the case was about to be dismissed when Ines cried:

“Indeed, there was a witness–the Christ the la Vega!”

There was a stunned silence. But, this was Catholic Spain, and finally, judge, Diego, Ines, court and the curious repaired to the Basilica of St. Leocadia* , which housed the carved Christ.

Kneeling between Diego and Ines before the life-sized crucifix, Don Pedro held up a Bible and asked if He, Jesus Christ, Sovereign Lord, would indeed swear to the couple’s solemn vow to wed each other.

In the dead silence that ensued, all present heard a voice coming from the statue,

“I SWEAR.”

At the same time, to the astonishment of all, the statue’s right arm, descended, its hand coming to rest on the Bible which the judge held up.

So struck were Diego and Ines, that giving up all earthly plans, they entered religious life.

As to the Christ de la Vega, to this day, His right arm remains in the same position, and, some affirm, His mouth slightly open in the utterance of His witness.

By A.F. Phillips

*Now the Ermita del Cristo de la Vega

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In the dead silence that ensued, all present heard a voice coming from the statue,