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Header - Come Infant Jesus!

 

This is the story of a marvelous miracle that took place a few days before Christmas of 1956 in Communist-occupied Hungary. The story comes to us through a Fr. Norbert, a parish priest in Budapest, who later fled to the West.

Gertrude was a rabidly militant Communist who was an elementary teacher in a girls’ school. She made it her mission to try to steal her pupils’ Catholic faith, and missed no opportunity to either mock their belief, or to slyly indoctrinate them in Marxist propaganda.

One particular pupil, Angela, an intelligent, devout little leader, asked Fr. Norbert to let her receive Holy Communion daily to help her bear up under her teacher’s constant persecution.

“She will persecute you worse,” Fr. Norbert warned, but the ten year old insisted she needed Jesus more than ever.
 

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Sure enough, from that day, sensing something different, Gertrude began a veritable psychological torture campaign.

Come Infant Jesus image 1On December 17, the schoolmistress devised a cruel trick meant to strike a deadly blow against what she termed “ancient superstitions infesting the school”.

In a sweet voice, she began to question the children, promoting atheistic materialism, arguing that things only exist that can be seen and touched. To illustrate her point, she asked Angela to step out of the room. Then she had the whole classroom call to her,

“Angela, come in!” called the girls in unison.

Angela entered, intrigued, but suspecting a trap.

“You see, girls,” oiled Gertrude, “because Angela is a living person, someone we can see, hear and touch, when we call her she hears us. But suppose…we were to call the Infant Jesus, in whom some of you seem to believe…do you think He would hear you?”

There was a loaded silence; then some voices timidly said,

“Yes we do.”

“What about you, Angela”, asked the teacher.

Now Angela understood. She expected a trap, but not one so terrible. But she answered with ardent faith,

“Yes! I believe that He hears me!”

Now Gertrude laughed loud and long. Then, turning to the class, she shot;

“Well! Then call Him!”

Silence.

The Communist’s arguments had not been totally ineffective.

Suddenly, Angela rushed to the front of the class, her eyes glistening. Facing her classmates she shouted,

“Listen girls, we are going to call Him! Let’s all call together: come, Infant Jesus!”

All the girls sprang to their feet and began, “Come, Infant Jesus, come, Infant Jesus…”

Come Infant Jesus image 2Gertrude was startled. She had not expected this reaction.

But the young ones continued. There was now an aura of expectant hope around the little leader.

When anticipation was at a height, the classroom door opened soundlessly, an intense brightness shining there, then entering the classroom and slightly increasing like the light of a great, gentle fire. In the midst of this splendor, there was a globe that shone with an even clearer light.

As the girls and teacher watched, riveted to the floor, the globe opened disclosing a handsome Infant dressed in a refulgent tunic. His smile was ravishing, as the little girls smiled back, in perfect peace and joy. Then, gently, the globe closed and disappeared through the door.

The children were still raptly gazing in the direction of the door, when they were jolted back to earth by a sharp scream.

“He CAME!” Screamed the terrified school mistress, “He CAME….!!!” And she fled down the hallway.

Fr Norbert questioned the little girls one by one. He attested under oath that he did not find the least contradiction in their accounts.

As for Gertrude, she was interned in an asylum. The tremendous shock of the apparition affected her godless mind, and she never stopped repeating, “He came, He came!”

 


Based on an account by Maria Minovskca in Magnificat Magazine, Braga, Portugal.

 

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Quote of the day

DAILY QUOTE for July 17, 2019

It is an arid fight, with neither palpable beauty nor define...

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July 17

It is an arid fight, with neither palpable beauty nor defined poetry.
In this fight, one sometimes advances in the night of anonymity,
in the mud of indifference or misunderstanding
amidst storms and bombardments unleashed by the combined forces of
the devil, the world and the flesh. But fear not,
this fight fills the angels of Heaven with admiration
and attracts the blessings of God.

Plinio Corrêa de Oliveira


PLEDGE REPARATION TO OUR LADY HERE!

Saint of the day

SAINT OF THE DAY

St. Clement of Okhrida

Clement of Okhrida was a convert of Sts. Cyril and Methodius...

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St. Clement of Okhrida

Clement of Okhrida was a convert of Sts. Cyril and Methodius, the apostles of Moravia and Pannonia.

At the invitation of the Bulgarian ruler, Boris, who had accepted Christianity in 865, Clement and his other companions including St. Nahum, St. Sabas and St. Angelarius, helped evangelize Bulgaria. Sts. Cyril and Methodius are also counted as two of the seven apostles of Bulgaria because though their official jurisdiction was over Moravia and Pannonia, they also kept an eye on the Bulgars, most of whom were heathens until formal evangelization began with the acceptance of Christianity by Boris.

Clement seems to have been the first man of the Slavic race to receive the episcopate. He became Bishop of Velitsa, close to Okhrida where he established a monastery. He was regarded as the founder of that see which became very important in subsequent history.

St. Clement is venerated in Bulgaria as well as Russia as a wonder-worker.

Weekly Story

WEEKLY STORY

In the Secret of the Rosary, St. Louis de Montfort relates t...

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The Rosary and the Possessed Girl

In his book, The Secret of the Rosary, St. Louis de Montfort relates that a Dominican, Father Jean Amat, was once giving a Lenten Mission in the Kingdom of Aragon, Spain, when a young girl, possessed by the devil was brought to him.

Father Amat began the exorcism. After several unsuccessful attempts, the priest had an idea; taking his Rosary, he looped it around the girl’s neck. 

No sooner had he done this, the girl began to squirm and scream and the devil, shouting through her mouth shrieked, “Take if off, take off; these beads are tormenting me!”

At last, moved to pity for the girl, the priest lifted the Rosary beads off her neck.

The next night, while the good Dominican lay in bed, the same devils who possessed the young girl entered his room. Foaming with rage, they tried to seize him, but he had his Rosary clasped in his hand and no efforts from the infernal spirits could wrench the blessed beads from him.

Then, going on the offensive and using the Rosary as a physical weapon, Fr. Amat scourged the demons crying out, “Holy Mary, Our Lady of the Rosary, help me, come to my aid!” at which the demons took flight.

The next day on his way to church, the priest met the poor girl, still possessed. One of the devils within her taunted him, “Well, brother, if you had been without your Rosary, we should have made short work of you…”

With renewed trust and vigor, the priest unlaced his Rosary from his belt, and flinging it around the girl’s neck commanded, “By the sacred names of Jesus and Mary His Holy Mother, and by the power of the holy Rosary, I command you, evil spirits, leave the body of this girl at once.”

The demons were immediately forced to obey him, and the young girl was freed.

“These stories,” concludes St. Louis de Montfort, “show the power of the holy Rosary in overcoming all sorts of temptations from the evil spirits and all sorts of sins because these blessed beads of the Rosary put devils to rout.”

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In the Secret of the Rosary, St. Louis de Montfort relates that a Dominican, Father Jean Amat, was once giving a Lenten Mission in the Kingdom of Aragon, Spain, when a young girl, possessed by the devil was brought to him.

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