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Header - Come Infant Jesus!

 

This is the story of a marvelous miracle that took place a few days before Christmas of 1956 in Communist-occupied Hungary. The story comes to us through a Fr. Norbert, a parish priest in Budapest, who later fled to the West.

Gertrude was a rabidly militant Communist who was an elementary teacher in a girls’ school. She made it her mission to try to steal her pupils’ Catholic faith, and missed no opportunity to either mock their belief, or to slyly indoctrinate them in Marxist propaganda.

One particular pupil, Angela, an intelligent, devout little leader, asked Fr. Norbert to let her receive Holy Communion daily to help her bear up under her teacher’s constant persecution.

“She will persecute you worse,” Fr. Norbert warned, but the ten year old insisted she needed Jesus more than ever.
 

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Sure enough, from that day, sensing something different, Gertrude began a veritable psychological torture campaign.

Come Infant Jesus image 1On December 17, the schoolmistress devised a cruel trick meant to strike a deadly blow against what she termed “ancient superstitions infesting the school”.

In a sweet voice, she began to question the children, promoting atheistic materialism, arguing that things only exist that can be seen and touched. To illustrate her point, she asked Angela to step out of the room. Then she had the whole classroom call to her,

“Angela, come in!” called the girls in unison.

Angela entered, intrigued, but suspecting a trap.

“You see, girls,” oiled Gertrude, “because Angela is a living person, someone we can see, hear and touch, when we call her she hears us. But suppose…we were to call the Infant Jesus, in whom some of you seem to believe…do you think He would hear you?”

There was a loaded silence; then some voices timidly said,

“Yes we do.”

“What about you, Angela”, asked the teacher.

Now Angela understood. She expected a trap, but not one so terrible. But she answered with ardent faith,

“Yes! I believe that He hears me!”

Now Gertrude laughed loud and long. Then, turning to the class, she shot;

“Well! Then call Him!”

Silence.

The Communist’s arguments had not been totally ineffective.

Suddenly, Angela rushed to the front of the class, her eyes glistening. Facing her classmates she shouted,

“Listen girls, we are going to call Him! Let’s all call together: come, Infant Jesus!”

All the girls sprang to their feet and began, “Come, Infant Jesus, come, Infant Jesus…”

Come Infant Jesus image 2Gertrude was startled. She had not expected this reaction.

But the young ones continued. There was now an aura of expectant hope around the little leader.

When anticipation was at a height, the classroom door opened soundlessly, an intense brightness shining there, then entering the classroom and slightly increasing like the light of a great, gentle fire. In the midst of this splendor, there was a globe that shone with an even clearer light.

As the girls and teacher watched, riveted to the floor, the globe opened disclosing a handsome Infant dressed in a refulgent tunic. His smile was ravishing, as the little girls smiled back, in perfect peace and joy. Then, gently, the globe closed and disappeared through the door.

The children were still raptly gazing in the direction of the door, when they were jolted back to earth by a sharp scream.

“He CAME!” Screamed the terrified school mistress, “He CAME….!!!” And she fled down the hallway.

Fr Norbert questioned the little girls one by one. He attested under oath that he did not find the least contradiction in their accounts.

As for Gertrude, she was interned in an asylum. The tremendous shock of the apparition affected her godless mind, and she never stopped repeating, “He came, He came!”

 


Based on an account by Maria Minovskca in Magnificat Magazine, Braga, Portugal.

 

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Quote of the day

DAILY QUOTE for March 18, 2019

The first end I propose in our daily work is to do the will...

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March 18

 

The first end I propose in our daily work is
to do the will of God;
secondly, to do it in the manner He wills it; and
thirdly to do it because it is His will.

St. Elizabeth Ann Seton


SATAN V. the Immaculate Conception  SIGN!

Saint of the day

SAINT OF THE DAY

St. Cyril of Jerusalem

Sixteen of the thirty-five years of his episcopate were spen...

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St. Cyril of Jerusalem

Though Cyril’s birthplace is unknown, he was certainly brought up in Jerusalem. His parents, very probably Christians, gave him an excellent education.

St. Jerome relates that Cyril was ordained to the priesthood by St. Maximus, the Bishop of Jerusalem, who thought so highly of Cyril's teaching that he was charged with the important duty of instructing the catechumens. Nineteen of these catechetical discourses, delivered without a book, have come down to us. These are invaluable as an exposition of the teaching and ritual of the Church in the fourth century.

Upon the death of St. Maximus, Cyril was elected to his episcopal see. Not long after his consecration as Bishop of Jerusalem, however, misunderstandings arose between Cyril and Bishop Acacius because of the latter’s leanings to Arianism – a heresy that denied the divinity of Christ. He was summoned before a council convened by Acacius but refused to appear. Accused of rebellion, and of distributing Church goods to the poor – which he justifiably did – Cyril entered a crucible of suffering through persecution.

His life as bishop was plagued with charges by the Arians and consequent exiles by Arian-supporting emperors. Sixteen of the thirty-five years of his episcopate were spent in exile. With the accession of Emperor Theodosius he was recalled and ruled undisturbed for the last eight years of his life.

Cyril participated in the great Council of Constantinople, when the Nicene Creed was promulgated in its amended form. He is thought to have died in 386 around the age of seventy. He was declared a Doctor of the Church in 1882.

Weekly Story

WEEKLY STORY

A Bargain with Our Lady

From his sick bed, Ansaldo implored the Mother of God to hea...

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A Bargain with Our Lady


In the city of Doul, in France, lived a young cavalier named Ansaldo. This gentleman was trained in the arts of horsemanship and battle. As was common for those in Ansaldo’s line of work, he received a battle wound from an arrow, which entered so deep into the jaw-bone, that it was not possible to extract the iron.

After four years of suffering in this way, the afflicted man could endure the pain no longer. His affliction had made him very ill, a shadow of his former robust self. He thought he would again try to have the iron extracted. But before doing so, this time he decided to make a bargain with the Blessed Virgin.

From his sick bed, Ansaldo implored the Mother of God to heal his jaw and restore his health to him. In exchange for this great grace, he vowed to visit a sacred image of her in the city of Doul every year, and make an offering of a certain sum of money upon her altar if she granted this request.

He had no sooner made the vow than the iron, without being touched, fell out of his jaw and into his mouth.

The next day, ill as he was, he went to visit the sacred image. With a great deal of effort, the weakened, but hopeful man placed the promised gift upon the altar.

Immediately, he felt himself entirely restored to health.

Amazed by the quick maternal response of Mary Most Holy, Andsaldo never forgot his vow and returned every year to honor his part of their bargain.

From the Glories of Mary, by St. Alphonsus Maria de Liguori.

From his sick bed, Ansaldo implored the Mother of God to heal him and restore his health to him. In exchange for this great grace,

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