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 Header - Our Lady Undoer of Knots

 

The practice of devotion to Our Lady Undoer of Knots originated with events that led to the painting of the image you see pictured here; whereas the theology of the devotion actually goes back to the second century. At that time, Saint Irenaeus wrote that, “The knot of Eve’s disobedience was untied by the obedience of Mary.”

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Painting of Our Lady Undoer of KnotsThe painting was donated in the early eighteenth century by Hieronymus Ambrosius Langenmantel (1641-1718), a canon of the Monastery of Saint Peter in Augsburg.

The donation is said to be connected with something that happened in his family that would resonate with families up to the twenty-first century.

His grandfather Wolfgang Langenmantel (1586-1637) was on the verge of separation from his wife Sophia Rentz (1590-1649) and therefore sought help from Father Jacob Rem, the Jesuit priest in Ingolstadt.

Consequently, on September 28th, 1615, in a solemn ritual act, Father Rem prayed to the Blessed Virgin Mary and said: "In this religious act, I raise the bonds of matrimony, to untie all knots and smoothen them," elevating the wedding ribbon1 and untying the knots one by one. While smoothing the ribbon out, the white ribbon attained such an intense brightness, that not even the palette of any painter could have reproduced it.

Immediately peace was restored between the husband and wife, and the separation did not happen. In thanksgiving and to keep alive the memory of this event, their grandson commissioned the painting of the "Untier of Knots."

The original Baroque painting of Mary Untier of Knots, by Johann George Melchior Schmidtner, is found in the church of St. Peter am Perlach, in Augsburg, Bavaria, Germany. It measures six feet in height and almost four feet in width. The painting has survived wars, revolutions, and secular opposition, and continues to draw people to it.

In the eighteenth century the devotion to Mary Untier of Knots was localized to Germany. The devotion was augmented during the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant disaster (1986), when victims sought help through the intercession of Mary Untier of Knots. The first chapel to be named Mary Untier of Knots was constructed in 1989 in Styria, Austria.

On December 8, 2000, a chapel dedicated to the Virgin Mary Untier of Knots was inaugurated in Formosa, Argentina. Since 1998, the devotion has been spreading in South America thanks to the booklet, Mary, Undoer of Knots Novena, published with ecclesiastical permission.

 

Devotion to Our Lady Undoer of Knots

Statue of Our LadyThe image of Our Lady Undoer of Knots depicts Mary suspended between heaven and earth, resplendent with light. The Holy Spirit in the form of a dove is above her head, reminding us that she became Mother of God and full of grace by virtue of the third person of the Trinity.

She is dressed resplendently in crimson, and a deep blue mantle representing her glory as Queen of the Universe. A crown of twelve stars adorning her head signifies her Queenship of the Apostles.

Her feet crush the head of the serpent indicating her victory over Satan. She is surrounded by angels, signifying her position as Queen of the Angels and Queen of Heaven. In her hands is a knotted white ribbon, which she is serenely untying.

Assisting her at the task are two angels: one presents the knots of our lives to her, while another angel presents the ribbon, freed from knots, to us.

Mary’s faith unties the knot of sin; but what are these knots we may ask?

They are the problems and struggles we face for which we do not see any solution… knots of discord in our family, lack of understanding between parents and children, disrespect, violence, the knots of deep hurts between husband and wife, the Couple fightingabsence of peace and joy at home.

There are also the knots of anguish and despair of separated couples, the dissolution of the family, the knots of a drug addicted son or daughter, sick or separated from home or God, knots of alcoholism, the practice of abortion, depression, unemployment, fear, solitude; all the knots of our life that suffocate the soul, beat us down and betray the heart’s joy and separate us from God.

KnotIt is like when a ball of yarn gets tangled, and it is impossible to untangle because of our impatience; it is as difficult to solve as a “Gordian knot.”2 In many cases the solving of the puzzle is so difficult that is destroyed.

The first thing we need to do is to place ourselves under the protection of the Blessed Virgin Mary, Mother of God, our help, our advocate and our intercessor. Thru prayer and meditation, we will be able to see how those knots were “made” and the reason why they were made.

With Our Lady’s maternal assistance, one by one you will untie every knot. Start with the simplest knots, so that you may have more clarity until you reach the main ones. This is why patience is so necessary. We need to use self-examination, analyze ourselves and pray. Prayer is what will give us the determination to continue and never give up.

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Pray:  Novena to Our Lady Undoer of Knots

NOTES:
1 The ribbon was placed by the maid of honor to represent an invisible union of the bride and the groom for the rest of their life. Their arms were joined together during the wedding ceremony.
2 The origins of the “Gordian knot,” a term commonly used to describe a complex or unsolvable problem, can be traced back to a legendary event in the life of Alexander the Great.

(found on Wikipedia) https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:%22Johann_Georg_Schmidtner%22,_by_Johann_Georg_Schmidtner.jpg 

 

 

Quote of the day

DAILY QUOTE for September 23, 2019

In all the events of life, you must recognize the Divine wil...

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September 23

 

In all the events of life, you must recognize the Divine will.
Adore and bless it,
especially in the things which are the hardest for you.

St. Padre Pio of Pietrelcina


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Saint of the day

SAINT OF THE DAY

St. Pio of Pietrelcina

Offering himself as a victim for the end of the war, Padre P...

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St. Pio of Pietrelcina

Francesco was born in the small Italian village of Pietrelcina on May 25, 1887. His parents, Grazio Forgione and Maria Giuseppa Di Nunzio, were peasant farmers, but they recognized their son was close to God. When he was only five years old, he solemnly consecrated himself to Jesus. It is said he often spoke with Our Lord, Our Lady and his guardian angel, who defended him against attacks by the devil. He joined the Capuchin Franciscans at the age of fifteen, and took the name Pio with his religious vows. After seven years of study he was ordained to the priesthood in 1910.

During the same month he was ordained, Padre Pio was praying in the chapel when Our Lord and His Blessed Mother appeared and gave him the Stigmata. However, the wounds soon faded and then disappeared. “I do want to suffer, even to die of suffering,” Padre Pio told Our Lady, “but all in secret." Soon after, he experienced the first of his spiritual ecstasies.

Pio was in the military for a short time, but was discharged due to poor health. Upon his return to the monastery, he became a spiritual director. He had five rules for spiritual growth: weekly confession, daily Communion, spiritual reading, meditation, and examination of conscience. He often advised, "Pray, Hope and Don’t Worry."

In July of 1918, Padre Pio received the visible Stigmata, the five wounds of Christ (hands, feet and side), after offering himself as a victim for the end of the war. By 1933, the holy priest was recognized by the Church and by 1934 had attracted thousands of pilgrims that attended his masses and frequented his confessional.

On September 23, 1968, Padre Pio said his final Mass, renewed his vows of poverty, chastity, and obedience and died in his cell after suffering from grave physical decline. Before his death, Padre Pio orchestrated and oversaw the building of the “House for the Alleviation of Suffering,” a 350-bed medical and religious center.

He was canonized on June 16, 2002 by Pope John Paul II. An estimated 300,000 people attended the canonization ceremony.

Weekly Story

WEEKLY STORY

“What is that?” Asked a curious voice as America Needs F...

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The Power of a Picture

“What is that?” Asked a curious voice as America Needs Fatima custodian Jose Ferraz stepped into the hotel elevator in Altamonte Springs, Florida. “This is the Pilgrim statue of Our Lady of Fatima,” replied Mr. Ferraz, “I take Her to visit people in their homes to spread the Fatima message.” He then handed the woman, who was a maid at the hotel, America Needs Fatima’s most popular picture. “This is a picture of Her.” The woman gasped. “I know that picture! It inspired a conversion.” She then asked excitedly, “Do you have a minute to hear the story?” 

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As Mr. Ferraz listened, he learned that the woman, Maria Vegra, had a 22-year old son who had recently passed away after three weeks in the hospital due to a fatal injury received in a car accident. While in the hospital, a priest would visit him every day to administer Holy Communion. The priest consistently offered the sacrament to the neighboring patient of Maria’s son, another young man who was also in critical condition. The young man would say, “No. I don’t believe in God.” But the priest continued to offer salvation. “Let me hear your confession and give you Holy Communion and Last Rights,” the priest said, “it will save your soul and get you to heaven.” Time after time, the young man stubbornly refused.

During the weeks of hospitalization and fruitless medical treatments, Maria had taken her son a picture of Our Lady of Fatima a friend had given her from an America Needs Fatima mailing.

She knew Our Lady’s watchful gaze would give her son peace in his last days. The day after she placed Our Lady’s picture at the foot of her son’s bed, she heard the voice of his stubborn neighbor: “please,” he said, “bring the picture closer to me. I want to look at the Lady.” 

Surprised but willing, Maria placed the picture in the middle of the two suffering men. 

After three days of letting the nearby picture of Our Lady touch his heart as he gazed into Her eyes, the suffering patient relented. “Please,” he called out, “bring me the priest. I want to receive the sacraments.”

A few days later, the young man died a Catholic. With a simple picture of Our Lady of Fatima, God touched a heart and saved a soul. 

 By Catherine Ferdinand

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“What is that?” Asked a curious voice as America Needs Fatima custodian Jose Ferraz stepped into the hotel elevator in Altamonte Springs, Florida. “This is the Pilgrim statue of Our Lady of Fatima,” replied Mr. Ferraz, “I take Her to visit people in their homes to spread the Fatima message.” He then handed the woman, who was a maid at the hotel, America Needs Fatima’s most popular picture. 

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