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The Solemnity of All Saints is celebrated on November 1 and was instituted to honor all the saints, those known and the vast number of those unknown. 

The solemn commemoration of each martyr’s death became a practice among the early Christians who would gather at the place of their martyrdom on the anniversary of their death. Groups of martyrs who died on the same day were naturally commemorated together on the same day. However, during the persecutions of Diocletian in the third century, such was the vast number of Christian martyrs that the Church, desiring that each should be honored and venerated, a common day was appointed for all of them.

At first only the martyrs and the Precursor, St. John the Baptist, were venerated in this solemn manner. Gradually, as a regular process of canonization was established, other saints were added to this practice.
All Saints In the year 609 or 610, Pope Boniface IV had 28 wagon loads of the martyrs’ bones carted to the Pantheon, a Roman temple dedicated to the pagan gods.

On May 13, he rededicated the temple as a Christian church and consecrated it to the Blessed Virgin and All the Martyrs. The Pontiff had the relics of the martyrs buried beneath it in order that, “the memory of all the saints might in the future be honored in the place which had formerly been dedicated to the worship not of gods but of demons,” according to the Venerable Bede.

From this date, on which the translation of the relics of the early Christian martyrs took place, the Pope ordered the solemn commemoration of their memory. In the following century, Pope Gregory III dedicated a chapel in the Basilica of Saint Peter to All the Saints and fixed November 1 for their solemn feast day.

A hundred years later, his namesake, Pope Gregory IV, extended the celebration of the Feast of All Saints to the universal Church.

 


 

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Quote of the day

DAILY QUOTE for July 7, 2020

Make it a practice to judge persons and things in the most f...

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July 7

 

Make it a practice to judge
persons and things
in the most favorable light
at all times and under all circumstances.

St. Vincent de Paul


My Mother, I will stand with you on OCTOBER 10, 2020

Saint of the day

SAINT OF THE DAY

St. Palladius

As Ireland's first bishop, he preceded St. Patrick, and buil...

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St. Palladius

Though not much is known about St. Palladius, we first hear his name mentioned by St. Prosper of Aquitaine in his Chronicles as a deacon who insisted with Rome for help against the Pelagian heresy then rampant in Britain. In response, the Holy See sent St. Germanus of Auxerre to combat the heresy.

Around 430, Pope Celestine I consecrated Palladius a bishop, and sent him into Ireland as its first bishop, preceding St. Patrick. Though not too successful with the Irish, he built three churches in Leinster.

Leaving Ireland, Palladius sailed for Scotland where he preached among the Picts. He died at Fordum, near Aberdeen a short while after arriving.

Weekly Story

WEEKLY STORY

The young men began to boast of some foolish love affairs. N...

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A Young Man and His Lady Love

In twelfth century England, a group of young men had gathered and were bragging of their various feats, as young men have done since the beginning of time.

The lively conversation went from archery to sword fighting to horsemanship, each trying to outdo the accomplishments of the others.

Finally, the young men began to boast of some foolish love affairs. Not to be outdone by his peers, a noble youth named Thomas declared that he, too, loved a great lady, and was beloved by her.

Thomas of Canterbury meant the most holy Virgin as the object of his affection, but afterwards, he felt some remorse at having made this boast. He did not want to offend his beloved Lady in any way.

Seeing all from her throne in heaven, Mary appeared to him in his trouble, and with a gracious sweetness said to him: "Thomas, what do you fear? You had reason to say that you loved me, and that you are beloved by me. Assure your companions of this, and as a pledge of the love I bear you, show them this gift that I make you."

The gift was a small box, containing a chasuble, blood-red in color. Mary, for the love she bore him, had obtained for him the grace to be a priest and a martyr, which indeed happened, for he was first made priest and afterwards Bishop of Canterbury, in England.

Many years later, he would indeed be persecuted by the king, and Thomas fled to the Cistercian monastery at Pontignac, in France.

Far from kith and kin, but never far from his Lady Love, he was attempting to mend his hair-cloth shirt that he usually wore and had ripped. Not being able to do it well, his beloved queen appeared to him, and, with special kindness, took the haircloth from his hand, and repaired it as it should be done.

After this, at the age of 50, he returned to Canterbury and died a martyr, having been put to death on account of his zeal for the Church.

From the Glories of Mary, by St. Alphonsus Maria de Liguori.

The young men began to boast of some foolish love affairs. Not to be outdone by his peers, a noble youth named Thomas declared that he, too, loved a great lady, and was beloved by her.

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